spike pueringer investments

hbk investments strategies

See how Citi is taking steps to help mitigate the effects of the pandemic, from helping clients to providing relief through funds to frontline healthcare workers, organizations such as No Kid Hungry and more. Despite the pandemic limiting options for group events, Citi was determined to do our part through meaningful volunteerism. The Citi Plex Account is a new digital checking and savings account built to make managing money simpler, smarter and more rewarding. Community Development Financial Institutions do more than provide capital, they level the playing field for communities and populations at risk of being left behind. Market attention has focused on the bearish potential return of the U.

Spike pueringer investments

Duran Duran, a band from Birmingham, England, were among the leading lights of the New Romantic movement, which cleverly combined an art-school sensibility with the kind of pop-funk stylings a mainstream audience could actually dance to. The cover design for their second studio album, Rio, pulls off the same trick. It was designed by Malcolm Garrett and illustrated by Patrick Nagel , who was known for celebrating the female form in a style that combined the Art Deco tradition with contemporary fashion designs.

The cover of U2's War took an unusual but inspired approach to illustrating the concept of conflict. And with its controversial songs about war and conflict, like Sunday, Bloody Sunday, their third studio album could be considered the apex of their rebellious youth.

Rather than going the obvious route of picturing a battle scene, though, Irish graphic designer Steve Averill took the inspired decision to instead use a child, powerfully conveying the loss of innocence created by war.

The boy staring intensely and unsettlingly at the camera is Peter Rowen , the brother of the artist Guggi , who is a friend of Bono's. Rowen appeared on three U2 albums in total, and is now himself a professional photographer.

He's even brought things full circle, by shooting U2 in concert. At a time when music was largely divided along genre and racial lines, three Jewish boys brought together rap and heavy rock in one album, without compromising on the raw, angry energy of either. Designed by Steve Byram and illustrated by World B. And just in case you needed the irony spelling out, the plane's tail number, 3MTA3, spells "Eat Me" backwards.

Musically and lyrically, Public Enemy's third studio album remains one of the most inventive and ambitious rap albums of all time. From the biting social commentary of is a Joke, about the variance in police response times between black and white neighbourhoods, to the revolutionary rage of Fight the Power, this record changed the game and has arguably yet to be bettered. The cover design, too, is a classic. Group leader Chuck D, who had himself studied graphic design at New York's Adelphi University, came up with the concept of two worlds a 'black' planet and Earth eclipsing.

The group enlisted B. Johnson , a NASA illustrator, to create the design, and the apocalyptic result is a fantastical commentary on the racial paranoia of white nationalism. At the beginning of the s, it seemed like rock music was starting to go stale and repeat itself.

Then came grunge, which brought everything back to its basics and acted like a big 'reset' button, just as punk had done two decades earlier. Nirvana's second album brought grunge into the mainstream, following the success of their number one hit Smells Like Teen Spirit. And its unusual cover was attention-grabbing to say the least. The dollar and fish hook were added later. The child he shot was four-month-old Spencer Elden, the son of one of Weddle's friends. He's now 27 and working as an artist in LA, while Weddle has continued to be an advertising photographer specialising in underwater work.

Throughout the s, the divide between indie music and dance music couldn't have been more marked. Then came acid house, ecstasy, rave A major landmark in the resulting crossover was Primal Scream's third album, which brought together rock, psychedelia, dub, house and gospel in one glorious concoction. Tragically Cannell took his own life in It was even recreated as an official postage stamp in , as part of the Royal Mail's Classic Album covers collection. As the s progressed, British youngsters started to tire of ecstasy-fuelled raves, and a vacuum opened up in youth culture.

This was quickly filled by a return to the old-fashioned pursuits of boozing and listening to rock bands Best at managing this contradiction were Blur; middle-class student types who nonetheless appealed to the masses with their mockney accents, Kinks-influenced tunes and clever appropriation of working class culture. Parklife, their third studio album, saw them at the height of their powers, from Girls and Boys, which poked fun at Club holidays, to the title track, which guest-starred Quadrophenia actor Phil Daniels to brilliant comic effect.

All this post-modern authenticity was topped off by a brilliant cover based on the unlikely topic of greyhound racing. Other images Blur considered were a fruit and veg market stall, a betting shop window The image used, shot by photographer Bob Thomas, was taken from a stock image library and was not, contrary to popular belief, shot in Walthamstow.

The confusion comes because a separate shoot for the inside cover was carried out at the famous East London track, which has since been converted into flats. Instead, his funny and poetic lyrics led him to be instantly adopted by middle-class intellectuals, a fact that baffles him to this day. Skinner's embrace by the intelligensia may also have been subconsciously been inspired by the highbrow nature of his cover art.

His debut album features an image titled Towering Inferno, shot in by German artist and photographer Rut Blees Luxemburg. Part of a series called London: A Modern Project that focuses on the capital at night, the shot fits nicely into the "sex, drugs and on the dole" narrative spun by Skinner throughout his debut.

One of the best-selling albums of the s and the winner of two Grammys, Fallen was the debut of Evanescence, a genre-defying Christian band that combined elements of nu metal, alternative metal and goth. But its influence went way beyond 'just' music. Countless youngsters since its release have testified to the way its lyrics, which deal with subjects of alienation, depression, suicide and death, have helped them deal with the angst of 'feeling different' from their peers.

Seen in that light, the album's cover art, featuring frontwoman Amy Lee in defiant alt-girl pose, was perfectly chosen. The singer is staring right at the viewer, provoking a feeling of empathy and shared experience, but at the same time the blurry nature of the image and the cold, harsh colour palette speak to feelings of helplessness and isolation.

It's not necessarily the happiest of scenes, but for many fans, it's been an essential and life-enhancing one. A punk rock opera might sound like a contradiction in terms, but Green Day went ahead and did it anyway. This concept album follows the story of Jesus of Suburbia, a teenage anti-hero, and it spawned five hit singles, including the incendiary title track; a stinging critique of right-wing American media that has arguably never been bettered. A game-changing album demands attention-grabbing artwork, and this cover design, featuring a heart-shaped hand grenade held in a blood-soaked fist, delivers it in spades.

The design takes in a number of influences, and is said to be inspired by Chinese communist propaganda art, a lyric from the song She's a Rebel 'he's holding on my heart like a hand grenade" , and Saul Bass's poster for the film The Man with the Golden Arm. As the world strode confidently from the 20th to the 21st century, suddenly everything was going from analogue to digital. And Blur singer Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett , the comic artist behind Tank Girl, decided to get ahead of the curve by forming Gorillaz , the world's first virtual band.

Combining hip-hop and electronica, the musical output of the band was groundbreaking enough, but they further excited audiences and the media by presenting themselves in the form of cartoon characters, from magazine covers to music videos to websites. At a time when most people were just learning what an avatar was, it was a clever idea, and one that effortlessly translated to the cover of this, their second and seminal album.

One of only three albums released by a female artist to have spent more than weeks on the Billboard , Born to Die combines elements of indie pop and trip-hop with New York singer Lana del Rey's haunting vocals in a way that's far greater than the sum of its parts. And the cover, art-directed by David Bowden , was suitably and beautifully epic. The impactful design combines an arrestingly mournful image of the singer, photographed by Nicole Nodland , with big and bold typography based on a bespoke font, adding a truly cinematic feel to the design.

One of the biggest stars of the decade, country-turned-pop singer Taylor Swift has won fans by being open and personal about herself, and the cover of her first 'pure' pop album, , fits perfectly into that narrative. Light years away from the pouting, airbrushed glamour shots of her rivals, it features just a simple Polaroid of the singer, cut off at the eyes, with T. Nothing complicated, nothing overblown Let's be frank; in the modern era, with streaming taking over from downloads and social sharing replacing record-store browsing, album artwork has declined in importance.

But if an artist is big enough, it still makes an impact, and few artists have been bigger in the s than Beyonce. The cover shows the singer standing next to a car, wearing a fur coat and cornrow braids, hiding her face behind her arm. But there's no official explanation about why this particular shot was chosen, leaving fans to speculate on the meaning of the cornrows symbolising black culture? In a social media age in which being talked about seems to be the main aim of all celebrities, from pop stars to Presidents, this may be the perfect album cover for our times.

Natural wonders come in all shapes and sizes. Sitting at 1, feet below sea level, the Dead Sea is the lowest body of water on Earth's surface. Located in a desert and featuring a high concentration of salt, it's the perfect spot for floating. The water is beautiful enough on its own, but the deposits and columns of salt that rise out of the water give it a unique, otherworldly look. When lakes near these Bolivian salt flats overflow, they create a majestic mirrored surface that reflects the sky and clouds above.

The vast oasis of salt boasts a horizon that never seems to end, making this spot a photographer's dream. Danxia refers to a special type of landscape found in southwestern China. Chances are you've never seen anything like it before. With over million users, Instagram's popularity shows no signs of waning. And while there are plenty of ways to make money on Instagram , whether that be via Stories or the main feed — or a mixture of the two — its interface can still irritate.

If you find yourself frustrated at the inability to clearly paragraph in Instagram, or are wondering how to find the hashtags most relevant to your feed and audience, you're in luck. Read on to discover our top Instagram hacks to make your life easier, your feed look better, and to hopefully attract more followers to your profile. Not being able to separate text is probably one of Instagram's most annoying features.

Luckily there are a few workarounds to add some lovely white space into your captions. Instagram will give your special character or emoticon a line of its own. If you find it fiddly to do this within Instagram's interface, you can also create your whole caption complete with line breaks in a separate app such as Notes, and then copy and paste it over.

Instagram will copy the formatting of your original post, and you will have lovely line breaks separated with your chosen characters or emoticons. The second way to create line breaks involves creating actual white space instead of using special characters to trick Instagram. Here's how you do it:. Write your caption in Instagram, press return do not add a space after the end of your content or else this won't work and then copy and paste the following into the interface:.

You can either copy the spaces between the brackets, or copy the whole thing and then delete the brackets — be sure not to delete the spaces between them. The result should be beautiful clean white space in your caption. Repeat as many times as necessary. Your bio should be short, to the point and provide as much information about you as possible in the characters available. To create a bio that has spaces, write it first in Notes or another app, and then copy it over.

You can also create interesting alignments by adding in spaces before you copy it. You may have to fiddle around a little bit to get the perfect centre alignment, for example, but it'll be worth it. Don't forget that your bio is the only place on your profile that you can add a live link, so make it a good one.

You can also add relevant emoticons, hashtags and links to other accounts here to make your profile more likely to appear in searches. First, write something on your Story press the Aa button and then type your message , and then select all the text. Hold until a little white pointer appears. Then, with a different finger, tap and hold a colour, until the spectrum of colours appears. Do not let go. The final step is to drag both fingers to the left, one across your text, another across your colour spectrum.

Go slowly and you should get a rainbow effect. Don't worry if you don't get this first time as it takes a bit of practice. If it's not working, it's likely that you didn't select your text properly. Check back that a little white pointer has appeared and try again. Sometimes it can be hard to think up hashtags, which is why it's useful to be able to see a whole bunch of related hashtags based on the one you can think of.

To do this, go to the magnifying glass 'Explore' function and type in a keyword. Tap across to the Tags column and then choose a hashtag from the list you see. When you click on that page, you'll get a whole page of posts with that hashtag. Click on a hashtag and look at the grey bar that says Related. This shows you all the related hashtags, and should give you plenty of ideas for which hashtags to use. Once you've got a list of hashtags you regularly use, you'll probably get bored of typing out the same ones every time you post.

The good news is you can use text replacement to speed up this process. Under Phrase, type the hashtags that you want to appear, for example, creativity design designadvice designinspiration. Then, in the Shortcut section, add the word or words that you will type to get those hashtags, for example, hash. On Android, the process is pretty similar. This allows you to add shortcuts as above to access hashtags faster. Once these are saved, the next time you type hash in Instagram or anywhere on your phone, so watch out , these hashtags will appear.

You can save as many different combinations of hashtags as you like, and can also use text replacement to insert line breaks, or write automatic replies to common enquiries you might get on Instagram, for example. If you usually use the same filters — and for visual cohesion on your feed, we recommend you do — then you might be pleased to know you can rearrange them so the ones you use the most are easiest to access.

To do so, go to Filter when you post a photo or video, and then scroll right to the end of the filters, where you'll see it says Manage. Click on this and you'll see a list of all the filters. If you hold down the three lines of each filter you can move them around, or even uncheck the blue tick to hide any filters you never use. Don't worry, this isn't permanent, you can easily rearrange the order later on, or unhide any hidden filters again later by checking the circle if you change your mind.

On a cloudless night, stars provide a breathtaking view: hundreds, thousands, of milky-white specks, draped over the Earth like a sparkling quilt. But stars can be annoying for astronomers trying to observe distant planets. Even the youngest planets, still glowing brightly from the heat of their formations, are millions of times fainter than their stars. Only a handful of exoplanets have ever been observed directly.

Stars are just too bright. Astronomers are always brainstorming new ways to observe exoplanets, and Schwarz and her fellow researchers recently did it in a very clever way: by making stars disappear. The team, led by Jens Hoeijmakers , an astronomer at the University of Bern in Switzerland, collected archival images, taken by the Very Large Telescope in Chile, of a star called Beta Pictoris, located about 63 light-years from Earth.

Beta Pictoris is orbited by a planet several times the mass of Jupiter, named Beta Pictoris b. The telescope observations had captured the light coming from the Beta Pictoris system. Through a method known as spectroscopy, the astronomers split this light into different wavelengths, known as a spectrum, in the same way a prism splays light into a rainbow of colors. This process can reveal all sorts of properties about a source, including its chemical composition.

The team compared the archival images, pixel by pixel, to the known signals of four kinds of molecules: carbon monoxide, water, methane, and ammonia. A match indicated the presence of a given molecule in the star system. When they looked for water or carbon monoxide, the planet bloomed into view. The astronomers had teased out a direct image of an exoplanet, molded not out of light, but of the molecules drifting in its atmosphere. Which is rarely the case with exoplanet data.

But in this case, it was completely clear. It was crystal clear. In all four scenarios, the star showed no evidence of the four molecules, which meant it remained invisible. Here, the researchers have added a star-shaped marker to indicate its location. The nearby orb, seen as red through the lens of carbon monoxide and as blue through water, is the planet. In addition to the pretty pictures, the technique reveals some information about the conditions of the planet.

By the same measure, Beta Pictoris b is too hot to maintain carbon monoxide and water, but cool enough to support methane and ammonia. Cool is relative, of course. This method can only be used if a planet and its star differ in their chemical compositions.

Some stars can be dim enough to support the existence of some of the same molecules that can be found in planetary atmospheres. And the technique only works for characterizing exoplanets, not detecting new ones. Imagine scouring telescope images of random star systems, pixel by pixel, looking for hints of molecules that may or may not indicate the presence of a planet. What astronomers need now are powerful telescopes and crafty analyses that can dim the starlight and reveal the characteristics of some of these worlds.

After looking over some of the posts around the Off-Topic forum for the first time, I'm thinking this may be one of the furthest off topic. Anyone else around here that are fishkeepers and are just up for a nice conversation? One of the defining features of branding over the last decade is the freedom that social media gives for anyone to launch an immediate personal critique.

Or more accurately, often, a tirade of mouth-frothing abuse. In fact, many of the most controversial rebrands of recent years had to batten down the hatches and weather the storm of hatred well before they were actually rolled out — and in some cases, were never rolled out at all as a result. Other times, when the furore dies down and people see in the full branding scheme in context rather than just the logo in stark isolation, hate turns to love.

Sometimes, those initially hated rebrands turn out to become the world's best logos. So what can these widely-reported PR disasters teach us about branding? Read on for our analysis of 10 of the most hated logos of all time One thing's for sure, Wolff Olins' bold, mould-breaking brand for London attracted plenty of flak. Criticisms ranged from simple legibility concerns, to more outlandish claims that Lisa Simpson appeared to be engaging in fellatio.

It got political when Iran's Olympic team insisted it spelled out 'Zion', and someone else spotted a swastika. Matters worsened further when the bright, flashing colours from the promo film induced epileptic fits. Once the Olympics kicked off in earnest, and the brand was seen in context across a dizzying array of applications, attention shifted to the glorious summer of sport in the UK capital.

And amongst a sea of bland, identikit, safe Olympics logos, most people around the world could still pick it out of a line-up instantly. The lesson here? Breaking new ground and doing something daring with a brand will get you noticed. Not always for the right reasons, but sometimes it's better to be brave and different — and hated by some — than to fade into oblivion.

That's how innovation happens. Gap's utterly disastrous attempt to embrace the pared-back, minimalist, Helvetica-vanilla revolution blew up so comprehensively in its face that the whole thing was pulled after less than a week. In place of its iconic blue square with tall, condensed serif type, the US clothing giant attempted to launch something so half-hearted and limp, the internet descended into a maelstrom of mockery and snide imitation.

What's to be learned from this debacle? Firstly, don't ever throw away brand heritage to try and embrace a new trend — but perhaps most importantly, know when you've got it wrong, and concede defeat. Wolff Olins met with controversy once again with its rebrand of USA Today — a title that, since its launch in the s, has grown into one of the widest-circulated newspapers in the States, alongside the substantially older Wall Street Journal and New York Times.

The backbone of the rebrand was a simple visual system, based around a large, flat-colour blue circle — an ultra-minimalist rendition of the previous globe graphic — and stacked Futura all-caps text. Unfortunately, at first glance it was far too simple for some, attracting a tirade of abuse accusing it of being simplistic, off-brand and even insulting to readers' intelligence.

The branding solution was more than met the eye, however. As well as being pared-back, clean and simple, it was also incredibly versatile — the circle acting as a container device for content, and the colour scheme signifying different sections of the paper. It works, very effectively. The lesson? When there's a more complex identity system that needs to be seen in context, ignore that initial wave of criticism and launch with confidence.

Like Gap, this is another short-lived rebrand that ultimately buckled under overwhelmingly negative attention. When juice brand Tropicana ditched its instantly recognisable 'straw stuck in an orange' motif and replaced it with a generic crop of a glass of orange juice, people simply weren't having it. Customer complaints reached sufficient volume that the brand's owner, PepsiCo, threw in the towel and reverted to the original branding within a couple of months.

The lesson here is something of a no-brainer: if you have something distinctive and well-loved about your brand that gives it shelf-standout in a competitive FMCG sector, don't chuck away in a misguided attempt to look 'contemporary'. This is the oldest example on this list, from the year — in many ways a precursor of the public furore around high-profile rebrands that would come to define this millennium so far. It was an unmitigated PR disaster. In a move widely derided at the time as an attempt to 'greenwash' its reputation, oil giant British Petroleum brought Landor on board to replace its imperialist green-and-yellow shield with a delicate geometric flower.

The chunky all-caps 'BP' become lowercase, hovering above the flower, with a new slogan: 'Beyond Petroleum'. Given that the rebrand and its subsequent global rollout cost tens of millions of dollars, environmentalists were quick to point out BP had spent far more on its new logo than on investing in renewable energy sources.

Subversive designers turned the logo into a meme, complete with stricken turtles and oil-drenched seabirds. The lesson here, which many companies have learned the hard way over the years, is that you can't paper over the cracks with branding and expect people to change their opinions — authenticity is everything, and an ideological rebrand such as this needs organisational change to back it up.

DesignStudio's rebrand of Airbnb launched the agency into the global spotlight back in , and was the first in a string of controversy-attracting projects that included Premier League and Deliveroo. These figured fairly low on the list of things the public compared the symbol with, however. Others insisted it evoked the chin of Family Guy's Peter Griffin, amongst other things. If you and the client stand by the thinking behind a rebrand, don't let social media trolls get to you.

Unlike Gap or Tropicana, this one definitely improves with age. When you have an effortlessly iconic logo designed by a master such as Massimo Vignelli, you'd think it would be a tough decision to ditch it. That's exactly what American Airlines did, and people got mad. Vignelli's bold, graphic cross-winged eagle symbol, neatly sandwiched between the twin 'A's, had a pleasing visual symmetry that felt both timeless and elegant.

Its replacement is none of those things, watering the confident navy down to a softer blue and reducing the majestic eagle in flight to an abstract beak. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. And if you have a Vignelli classic under your belt, it definitely ain't broke. But few things are more likely to put you off enjoying your fluffy, syrupy breakfast fare than the fixed gaze of a demonic clown.

Perhaps in an attempt to emulate the warm 'smile' motif that Turner Duckworth achieved so effectively for Amazon, IHOP capitalises on the face-like juxtaposition of the 'o' and the 'p' in its name. But while the combination of chunky, blue rimmed, staring eyes and thin red grin exudes many things, warmth isn't among them. If you're trying to make a logo look friendly and approachable, test it on actual humans and see if they bolt in terror.

That'll be a good clue. One of the biggest milestones in the death of skeuomorphism, and the rise of flat design, was when Instagram dropped its retro, textured camera in favour of a pared-back icon, adorned with a neon rainbow gradient. The internet freaked out. Like many of the other examples on this list, this was a rebrand that launched a thousand memes. Panned for looking like something that had crawled out of Microsoft Paint in the '90s, this radical new direction for Instagram's logo spawned plenty of rip-offs and snide 'logo generators'.

Some lamented the fact that Instagram's 'retro camera' essence — the whole founding principle of the app - had been lost, while others simply hated the zingy, garish colour palette. But as flat design became the defining look and feel of iOS, the 'native' feel of the app icon has acted in its favour. Where it was once known primarily for its retro photography filters — for which the skeuomorphic camera was a neat fit - Instagram is now one of the foremost social media platforms.

Sometimes, initially unpopular design decisions have broader strategic reasons at their heart. Sometimes hatred for a logo goes far beyond aesthetic preference, such as in the case of the Cleveland Indians' long-controversial mascot, Chief Wahoo. It has been called offensive, outdated and even racist for using a cartoonish caricature of a Native American, in a climate where most US sport teams — with notable exceptions, such as the Washington Redskins — have stopped doing so.

However, it seems the pressure has now had an effect, as Chief Wahoo will no longer feature on the Cleveland Indians' uniform from the start of the season, with the team conceding that it is "no longer appropriate" to do so. Ocasio-Cortez, meanwhile, is an avowed democratic socialist who organized for Bernie Sanders, a man who stubbornly continues to insist on identifying as an independent. It is not at all clear that loyalty to the Democratic Party per se is one of her chief motivations.

This is perfectly in keeping with the fact that many on the hard left have their own objections to the status quo in U. Sanders and his devotees are enthralled by the heterodox economist Stephanie Kelton, who has risen to intellectual celebrity by arguing that the only real constraint on federal spending is inflation, and that alarm over deficits is, in short, nonsensical.

Here I am reminded of the work of J. Mason, another leading light among left-wing economists, who argues that socialists have good reason to be wary of globalization, at least until the distant time when democratic decision-making is no longer bounded by the nation-state. And if Ocasio-Cortez has expressed alarm over the extent to which the president and his allies are violating norms of civility, I have missed it.

Like many on the left, she seems more drawn to the view that there is no place for civility when doing battle with fascists. The political fortunes of Ocasio-Cortez and other socialist outsiders are closely tied to the omnipresence of Donald Trump and the galvanizing effect he has had on the left. When Washington is dominated by the right, the public shifts to the left. At the same time, she favors a suite of other policies, such as Medicare for all, a universal guarantee of jobs paying a living wage, and tuition-free higher education, that would have the cumulative effect of sharply increasing redistribution from the native-born nonpoor to low-income immigrant-headed households.

This is true even before we take into account, for example, the earned-income tax credit, food stamps, and other policies designed to raise the effective incomes of households that command low by American standards market wages. It is telling that libertarian immigration advocates are deeply concerned about the rising popularity of the jobs guarantee and, relatedly, a universal basic income , on the left.

Just as one must first pay into the Social Security system for a period of time before becoming eligible for benefits, the idea is that all social programs ought to become more contributory. As an aside, questions of redistribution are central to why some conservatives, myself included, favor limiting low-skill immigration: because we believe there is a trade-off between the number of poor newcomers and the generosity with which they are treated, and we favor an approach that is somewhat less open while being far more generous to those Americans choose to admit.

Cosmopolitan libertarians, by and large, prefer moving in the opposite direction. By all accounts, Ocasio-Cortez sees things differently. Back in , Sanders denounced the McCain-Kennedy comprehensive immigration legislation, partly on the grounds that it would have expanded low-wage guest-worker programs.

Needless to say, Sanders did not mean this as a compliment. And while many of his disciples have rallied around the cause of abolishing ICE —something that could mean anything from renaming the agency and bringing it under the auspices of the Department of Justice, as its predecessor was, to dismantling all immigration enforcement outright, depending on who is doing the talking—he has, so far at least, conspicuously refused to do so , to the consternation of many on the left.

If he does come around to the cause of abolishing ICE , which may yet happen, my suspicion is that he will wind up supporting modest reforms and, crucially, a name change. What accounts for the distance separating Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez on immigration? Lest we forget, Sanders is 76 years old, and he has lived through previous waves of left-wing enthusiasm that have come and gone. If public opinion really is thermostatic, as I believe it is, young leftists could be overestimating the extent to which the backlash to Trump heralds deeper shifts in the beliefs of rank-and-file voters.

Or it could be that Sanders is a relic of the past and that open-borders socialism will soon be as American as apple pie. The Democratic Party seems determined to find out. Depending on where you're reading this, Pride parades are probably either already happening or about to take place. Pride festivals are conventionally more of a celebratory event, where people take the opportunity to let their flag fly, literally.

If you've ever been to a Pride event, chances are you've seen attendees proudly flying flags that represent them, many of which incorporate colour theory and symbols important to their cause. Perhaps the most well-known Pride flag is the rainbow flag, which recently made the headlines thanks to a prospective Kickstarter redesign , which aimed to make it even more inclusive. There are dozens of other flags you're likely to spot if you go to a Pride event.

To help you identify some of the most commonly seen designs, and maybe spot a flag that best represents you, we've rounded them up in this handy guide. Quick disclaimer — this list is by no means covers every niche! There are many, many flags catering to everything from rubber to bear brotherhood pride. But we hope this round up acts as a handy jumping-off point. Not surprising really, considering that it's designed to be as open and inclusive as possible. In fact it's such a recognisable shorthand for all things Pride that you'll often see the spectrum of colours used by brands in the run-up to festivities, with Skittles temporary rebrand being a notable exception.

Whereas today's rainbow flag often has six colours, the original design had eight thanks to the inclusion of pink and turquoise stripes. Baker even assigned a meaning to each colour. It's these meanings which have lead to artists creating variations that celebrate a specific audience or minority. And so it was that on 5 December , the bisexual pride flag was launched at the BiCafe's first anniversary party.

Taking inspiration from his work with nonprofit bisexual community organisation BiNet USA, Page's flag sees pink and blue bands overlap, with a purple stripe forming in between them. Many people have interpreted these colours in terms of their traditional masculine and feminine associations.

However, when speaking about the history of the bisexual flag , Page revealed his intended meaning. The blue represents sexual attraction to the opposite sex only straight and the resultant overlap colour purple represents sexual attraction to both sexes bi. Continuing the band of colours approach, the pansexual pride flag has been around since As well as increasing the visibility and recognition of the pansexual community, the pride flag also helps to distinguish it from bisexuality.

This can be seen in the use of colours on the flag. Instead of a purple band sandwiched between blue and pink stripes, the pansexual pride flag opts for a bright yellow. Yellow can be read as more of an ambiguous colour, which makes it perfect for representing non-binary attractions. The pink stripe stands for those who identify within the female spectrum, while blue represents the male spectrum. Not all Pride flags are based around striped designs. This flag represents the intersex community — defined as people who "do not fit the typical definitions for male or female bodies," according to the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Created in July by Organisation Intersex International Australia, the Intersex flag cleverly eschews colours with loaded gender meanings. Relying on yellow in a similar way to the pansexual pride flag, this design also uses purple as these colours were seen as appropriately hermaphrodite colours by the creators. Free for use by any intersex person or organisation who wishes to use it in a human rights affirming context, the flag has been picked up by multiple media outlets and groups. Since , the asexual flag has come to represent individuals with a low or absent desire for sexual activity.

Since the Asexual Visibility and Education Network AVEN first participated in an American pride parade in , members consulted as many people in the community as possible to create a flag. The chosen design can trace its roots back to visuals found on online forums outside of AVEN. This flag was also settled upon via a survey, making it one of the truly most democratic flags we've ever heard of.

Gone are the multicoloured stripes so often associated with Pride flags, they've been replaced instead with a labrys. The labrys, or double-bladed battle axe, used to be a symbol found in the ancient, fairly matriarchal civilisation of Minoan Crete. It makes sense then that over the years the axe has come to represent lesbian and feminist strength and self-sufficiency, as well as appearing on flags since the s. Individuals with a personal identity and gender that does not correspond with their birth sex have had a flag to call their own since Designed by transgender woman Monica Helms, the transgender pride flag was first flown as part of a pride parade in Phoenix, Arizona in Once again we see pink and blue stripes used to represent females and males.

In between these colours is a white stripe that stands for people who are intersex, transitioning, or have a neutral or undefined gender. Thanks to the way the flag is designed, there is no incorrect way to fly it, which Helms says signifies finding correctness in our lives. That music and mathematics are somehow related has been known for centuries. Pythagoras, around the 5th century BCE, may have been the first to discover a quantitative relation between the two: experimenting with taut strings, he found out that shortening the effective length of a string to one half its original length raises the pitch of its sound by an agreeable interval—an octave.

Other ratios of string lengths produced smaller intervals: corresponds to a fifth so called because it is the fifth note up the scale from the base note , corresponded to a fourth, and so on. In doing so, Pythagoras discovered the first logarithmic law in history.

The relations between musical intervals and numerical ratios have fascinated scientists ever since. Johannes Kepler, considered the father of modern astronomy, spent half his lifetime trying to explain the motion of the known planets by relating them to musical intervals. Half a century later, Isaac Newton formulated his universal law of gravitation, thereby providing a rational, mathematical explanation for the planetary orbits.

In doing so, they contributed significantly to the development of post-calculus mathematics, while at the same time giving us a fascinating glimpse into their personal relations and fierce rivalries. The ties between music and mathematics have fascinated me from a young age. He also spent many hours explaining to me various topics from his physics book, from which he himself had studied many years earlier.

In the chapter on sound there was a musical staff showing the note A with a number under it: , the frequency of that note. It may have been this image that first triggered my fascination with the subject. I still have that physics book and I treasure it immensely. My grandfather must have studied it thoroughly, as his penciled annotations appear on almost every page. There was just one professor who was sufficiently knowledgeable in the subject, and he agreed to be my advisor.

But first we had to find a department willing to take me under its wing, and that turned out to be tricky. So I applied to the newly-founded Department of Mechanics, and they accepted me. In the process I learned a lot of advanced mathematics, especially Fourier series and integrals. It served me well in my later work. I started my musical education playing Baroque music on the recorder, and later I took up the clarinet. This instrument has the unusual feature that when you open the thumb hole on the back side of the bore, the pitch goes up not by an octave, as with most woodwind instruments, but by a twelfth—an octave and a fifth.

This led me to dwell into the acoustics of wind instruments. I was—and still am—intrigued by the fact that a column of air can vibrate and produce an agreeable sound just like a violin string. But you have to rely entirely on your ear to feel those vibrations; they are totally invisible to the eye. When I was a physics undergraduate at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a group of students and professors decided to start an amateur orchestra, and I joined.

There is one bar in that overture where the clarinet plays solo, and it befell upon me to play it. I practiced for that single bar again and again, playing it perhaps a hundred times simultaneously with a vinyl record playing on a gramophone. Finally the evening arrived and I played my piece—all three seconds of it.

Throughout your book there runs a common thread—the parallels between musical and mathematical frames of reference. Can you elaborate on this comparison? But in the early s, Arnold Schoenberg set out to revolutionize music composition by proposing his tone row , or series , consisting of all twelve semitones of the octave, each appearing exactly once before the series is completed.

Can you say a few words about them? It is generally believed that over the ages, mathematics has had a significant influence on music. From a mathematical standpoint it was a brilliant idea, but it was out of sync with the laws of physics; in particular, it ignored other important intervals such as the major and minor thirds. Burkhardt Church in the German town of Halberstadt. The work was begun in and is an ongoing project, planned to be unfolding for the next years. There are eight movements, each lasting about 71 years.

But nothing was heard because the score begins with a rest—of 20 months. It was only on February 5, , that the first chord, two G-sharps and a B in between, was struck. Why astronomers? Because the source of this note is the galaxy cluster Abell , some million light years away.

The cluster is surrounded by hot gas at a temperature of about 25,, degrees Celsius, and it shows concentric ripples spreading outward—acoustic pressure waves. If you happened to look up at the sky this past weekend, you might have noticed a rare and beautiful sight: iridescent rainbow clouds, but not a drop of rain in sight.

Once again, major French publisher Ubisoft will be kicking off its E3 week with a press-conference presentation featuring all its upcoming games. A lot of Ubisoft's presentation will likely focus on the same still-unreleased games discussed before last year's E3.

Expect announcement of new content for some of Ubisoft's ongoing multiplayer games like For Honor and Rainbow Six Siege , too. Plus it wouldn't be an Ubisoft press conference without new sequels in franchises like Assassin's Creed , Far Cry , The Division and maybe a few others is it time for another Watch Dogs game, yet?

Read 1 remaining paragraphs Comments. And Spade herself—the bespectacled, brunette Catholic school girl from Missouri who married her college boyfriend yet somehow managed to conquer the cooler-than-thou New York fashion scene—was precisely the woman so many of us wanted to be like when we grew up. If we had ever forgotten this over the years, we were reminded painfully of that fact on Tuesday, when the year-old Spade was found dead in an apparent suicide.

After graduating from college in , Spade headed east to Manhattan and landed a temp job at Mademoiselle , where she worked her way up to accessories editor. Just as the bridal-fashion pioneer Vera Wang had done a few years previously, Spade spotted a void in the market she covered, quit her magazine job, and eventually launched her own line. It had, however, conditioned consumers to view nylon as a luxury fabric. Spade came up with an equally practical but more affordable nylon bag, which she infused with her own vintage, feminine sensibility.

The fourth of five sisters, Spade was an unapologetically girly designer. Spade was photographed around town wearing twinsets, cocktail rings, and leopard coats long before Wes Anderson came to prominence and Mad Men debuted on TV. But she reserved her highest praise for another obvious influence, Bonnie Cashin, who perfected the alchemy of fashion and function in the leather bags she designed for Coach in the s.

Like their creator, they always looked enviably put-together, without seeming too serious. Spade managed that rare trick of being timeless as well as trendy. Rather than chasing fads, she followed her own path, walking a fine line between cute and kitsch without ever putting a foot wrong. Post, collections began to include clothing and jewelry, and were less successful at sidestepping kitsch, according to some devotees.

Although Spade was no longer associated with her namesake company by the time she died, its image remains uniquely hers: pretty and preppy, and typically American in its seamless synthesis of optimism and nostalgia. California, he imagined, would be different—a place where liberal ideas flourished and where people were willing to rally against inequality and injustice. But Stevens, now 28, did not end up in the liberal den of San Francisco, the stoner paradise of Humboldt County, or the alternative-living community of Slab City, in the Sonoran Desert.

Stevens got a bigger microphone than he anticipated as a pastor when a series of tweets he had written about Palo Alto surfaced ahead of a city-council meeting earlier this month. After he resigned his post over the tweets, Stevens received national attention, with publications like The Guardian and the New York Daily News writing about his comments. Now, he has been embraced by the radical left, and he has continued to tweet his opposition to what he sees as white liberalism and apathy.

His radical approach to tearing down the system means he has very few tangible solutions to the inequality that plagues Silicon Valley. Stevens may be right that some sort of greater changes are needed to reduce inequality, but talking to him, I was more struck with how far his ideas were from something that most people in Palo Alto—and really, in California—would accept.

Perhaps a few decades ago, people in the Bay Area were willing to believe in revolution—to tune in and drop out, protest against Vietnam, join the Black Panthers. But today, the vast majority of liberals in California seem to have embraced capitalism and the tech industry. Gregory Stevens is a Californian from another era. He recalled a dinner party he attended with the staff of a wealthy family foundation, where people talked about how they had no worries about money or security.

Stevens began to wonder how that foundation could really help the poor. The city recently passed a law making it more difficult for people to live in RVs in the city, for example. It frustrated Stevens that he was encountering these attitudes in one of the most liberal places in America. He grew up in an extremely conservative, religious family in Florida, to a nurse practitioner mother and a therapist father.

The church had provided him solace when his sister died when he was younger, but he also pushed back against it. Once, when he was working for a Methodist church, he nearly lost his job, he said, after he refused to stand up for the national anthem because he thought Jesus would disagree with the violent policies of the United States military. His friends in Palo Alto talked about seeing the newest movies or TV shows, and not about revolution.

Stevens cuts a strange figure as a pastor. He befriends people on Twitter, including another gay man named Gregory Stevens who has served as a mentor of sorts. One of his other mentors is a Sufi Muslim. But he still believes in doing social-justice work through theology, he said. Christianity is the language that he knows best.

Stevens was unashamedly radical for the three years he worked at the First Baptist Church of Palo Alto. He started a radical reading group in which he would hand out readings about police violence and anarchism, and then discuss those topics with willing community members.

One of the sermons he preached in April told the congregation that they should not be content just being philanthropists and being kind. Senior pastor Rick Mixon told me the congregation seemed to like the sermon.

Stevens told me he was disappointed that people seemed to just politely listen and then go about their lives. Mixon also struggles with some of the larger issues Stevens raised, over the dilemma of how to raise awareness about poverty and homelessness in the wealthy environment of Silicon Valley, he said. The people on his doorstep, by contrast, have everything they could ever need.

This radicalism was not what made Stevens resign. The resident was trying to convince the city that the First Baptist Church of Palo Alto, which has been located on the same street corner since , should no longer be able to host non-secular activities. One of the music schools, a folk-dancing group, and a therapist have all left in recent months. Fury over the tweets, which also covered topics like the tendency of elderly people to fall asleep during church council meetings, the experience of watching someone pop a zit, and the female punk-rock group Pussy Riot, grew after council members asked First Baptist Church Pastor Rick Mixon about them at the council meeting on May Stevens himself told me community members did not show up to events hosted by the church about social activism.

Religion is a difficult subject in the Bay Area. In a recent episode of the television show Silicon Valley, an entrepreneur is embarrassed to be outed as a Christian, which, he says, will ostracize him from the people in power in the region. Stevens also told me that he was asked to write a letter of apology to the city, and that he did not want to do that because he does not believe that institutions like the city council or the police are legitimate.

When his lease is up in a few months, Stevens plans to head for San Francisco, where he says there are still some true liberals that exist, some people that believe in social-justice advocacy. He hopes to find work in a nonprofit, organizing the poor. Stevens may not have fit in Palo Alto, but without people like him, all vestiges of radicalism may disappear. When I talked to Mixon on Thursday afternoon, he sounded tired and defeated. He could give up the church, put the plot of land up for sale, and give the money he makes from selling the land—surely worth millions—to charity.

He walked away from his campsite beside Leopard Rock, a huge pile of schist slabs stacked like left-over roofing tiles, and into a vast plain ringed with red-burnished hills. He had 20 minutes of light left before sunset, and he intended to use them. This next part may sound like a reenactment from a nature documentary, but trust me: This is how it went down.

He sank his well-tanned arms in the sand up to the elbows. As he rooted around, he told me later, he had a revelation. Across the plain, seemingly stamped into its dry, stubbly grass, were circles of bare ground, each about the size of an aboveground pool.

This is more than an academic dispute over a tourist attraction, however. Fairy circles are a test case in the emerging field of biological-pattern analysis, where they may offer an encrypted message about the future of desert ecosystems—and the humans who hope to survive in them. The smallest fairy circles are about five feet in diameter, and the further north you go, the bigger they get; the largest circles, in Angola, can sprawl across feet. A single circle can persist for at least 75 years—maybe for centuries.

Among their many peculiar qualities is a spooky low-level magnetism: A magnet dragged across the inside of a circle picks up far more soil than it does outside its boundary. Since the s, scientists have spitballed theories about the origin of fairy circles.

The bare patches could be caused by chemical compounds emitted by Euphorbia damarana , a toxic bush. Or they could be the feeding grounds of a ravenous termite called Hodotermes mossambicus. And, I mean, there are always UFOs.

In , he began working as the scientific coordinator for BIOTA , a sprawling network of environmental measuring stations across southern Africa. His curiosity grew. This year, I joined him on one of his regular desert sojourns. T ermites, you have to understand, are a very big deal.

If you scooped up every animal across the global tropics and piled them on a scale, termites would account for roughly 10 percent of the total weight. Africa alone hosts over 1, termite species, including the genus Macrotermes , which builds cathedral-tower mounds that can stand taller than elephants. Various indigenous groups in Africa make use of termites, according to a recent ethnobiological study.

Our expedition numbered After buying supplies, we left in a caravan of 4x4s, kicking up a cloud of dust. As we drove west from central Namibia toward the Atlantic, the land got drier and drier. Dry river crossings. Woven bird nests. That night, we camped next to the sandy, empty bed of the Aba Huab River. But the Namib has looked like it does today for at least 55 million years, maybe longer, and for all of those eons, its plants and animals have been evolving in the face of impossibility.

We kept driving. And suddenly, there they were. He walked out into a field at the foot of a hill, me racing to follow him and his flock of students straggling behind. He pointed out the clearest fingerprint of his sand termites: a clump of grass coated in tubes of sand.

The termites build the tubes around the stems they eat, he said, crumbling some of the sheeting in his fingers. At the center is the bare patch. Surrounding that is what he calls the perennial belt, a thin ring of the tallest, healthiest grass in sight. Between the circles are rings of sparser grass, which he calls the matrix. His Science paper argued that the humble Psammotermes builds fairy circles to alter its environment, not unlike how beavers build dams.

In this view, each circle functions as a cistern—a hydrological savings account. When rain finally falls on these sandy patches of the Namib, the sun and the roots of plants suck the water right back out of the ground. But within the bare patch, the sand termites chew through all the plant roots, blocking growth. The absence of plants lets rainfall percolate further into the soil, to a deeper layer where it lingers in the pores between grains. He theorizes that here, the termites can drink their fill year-round, using specialized mouthparts to slurp water from the sand.

This strategy may help the termites maintain a storehouse of food, too. Edward Randak Ms. Jean McDonough Ms. Kathryn Throssell Mr. Peter Bowes Mr. Kathleen Leskela Dr. Marian Jones Kjera Dr. Johnson Mrs. Loris Toole Dr. Harr Mr. Kenny Thomas Ms.

Mary P. Helgeson Mr. Daryl Beam Dr. Donald Erickson Mr. Harold Roberts Mr. Ralph Slick Ms. Fae Bye Mr. Joe Phelps Mr. Eddie Richards Bette J. Bohlinger Mr. Stephen Worthington Ms. Ann Muthman Mr. Leo M. Doll Mrs. Donna Kent Dreamcatcher Endowment, Inc. Frank R. Durant Ms. Beverly Buzzelli Dr. Walter C. Degnan Mr. Alice Gordon Mrs. Margo S. Madalyn Quinlan Ms. Holly Caraway Mr. Randy L. Janice Munsell Ms. Elaine Locati Morris L. Braden Ms. Joanne Dodd Dale Brazer Ms. Mary K. Linda Brewer Helen Brown Ms.

Janice Larson Richard Burgin Mrs. Elaine Burgin Christine Calkins Mr. Barney J. Roat Edith Campodonico Dr. Hicks Dr. Malcolm Winter Constance M. Chenoweth Mr. Chenoweth Dean A. Chinn Ms. Jane Keller Mr. Joan Dantic Mr. Nemsgern Mrs. Hedegaard Dr. Peretti, D. Ruth Warren Mr. Harold Bohrer Ms. Reed Mr. Michael Cole Mrs. Glenyce Chinn Betty J. Christensen Mr. Sherwood Christensen Mr. Kathryn Clark Jane M. Cleveland Mrs. Bobbi Roberts Hilmar H. Cook Mrs. Inez H. Hubert R. Cook LaVerne Coons Ms.

Ralph Lee Mr. Paul Schmitt Ms. Pamela Trueblood Mr. Arnold Kuntz Mr. Bruce Nelson Mr. Daniel Fry Mr. Davie Hurlburt Ms. LaVonne Hunze Ms. Norma Jean Brown Mr. Corbin Ms. Linda Corbin Thomas J. Daly Dr. Alice Gordon Agnes V.

DeRocher Mr. Allen L. Dimon Dr. Alice Gordon Ms. Kathleen L. Baumgartner continued on page 10 9 10 Mr. Bill Thorndal Ms. Dorothy J. Metz Clem Dietrich Ms. Marinae Dietrich John M. Dietrich Mr. Austin Darkenwald Leigh R. Dotson Ms. Donald K. James Gary Eichele Mr. Betty Eickelberg Jean Ellis Dr. Alice Gordon Lloyd F. Emmons Mrs. Darla J. Emmons Robert H. Evans Mrs. Farrington Ms. Helen Dubin Rodney Feller Mr.

Walter R. Egged Lora B. Ferestad Mr. Brian S. Held June V. Ferris Mrs. Kay Will John Fladmo Mr. Terry Fladmo Mrs. Violet Fladmo Terry Friez Mr. Thomas Frank Harry Gaghen Mr. Gall Maralyn Gangstad Mr. Dan Stidham Julie Garcia Mr. Jack L. Garcia Kordell Michael Gatzemeier Ms. Gwen Gatzemeier Blaine Getchell Dr. Alice Gordon Terri K. Giesick Ms. Norma Hodgson Donna Gilden Dr. Hicks Mr. Earl Lindgren Cecelia Goodrich Ms. Joanne Dodd Gary Green Mr.

Terry Krum Mr. William Strauch Edith M. Greenleaf Ms. Pamela Conley Kathie Grmoljez Ms. Helgeson Helen Grunwald Mrs. Anita Giesick Robert Hagstrom Dr. Douglas Carr Mrs. Margaret E. Hubley Gary Haigh Mr. June Haigh Ms. Aikins Barbara Hammond Mrs. Victoria Hammond Helen Hancock Mr. Dushan P. Milovich Virginia Harkin Mr. Virel T. Guinn Judy Harris Mr. Joel S. Harris Matt Harshman Mrs. Kay Will Dale E. Hawkins Mr. Robert Hawkins Aubrey F. Haynes Ms. Linda L. Lehman Sterling Hayward Mrs.

Beverly Hayward Thomas E. Heald Mrs. Carol Heald Marion T. Hedegaard Mrs. Hedegaard Larry Hennen Ms. Ilene Waldo Kramer Herauf Mr. Adam Herauf Lloyd Herman Mr. Sandra Besel Lillian Hibscher Mr. James J. Hibscher T. Hines Mr. Lew Hines growth through giving tributes Anette Holden Mr. Ray L. Janice Munsell Dona L. Holzheimer Mr. Guinn Mr. Carlson Mr.

Samuel J. Mourich Mr. Dennis E. Andersen Mr. Lewis W. Holzheimer Dr. David Sorensen Mr. Burr Lively Ms. Gwen Gatzemeier Ms. Lelah Ritz Mr. Dale Holzheimer Mr. William Witt Betty T. Hopkins Ms. Cheryl Whiteman Ms. Betty Kegson Ms. May Sloan Ms.

Doris Katzung Mr. Ben Herzog Mr. Henry W. Hopkins Mr. Mark Forman Ms. Cecil Ruth Al Housinger Mrs. Jon Ness Dr. Terry A. Kilborn Beulah Hunnes Mr. Cristi H. Hunnes Asa Hurd Mr. Earl Lindgren Harriett Hurd Dr. Hurd Paul B. Hurd Dr. Hurd Donald E. Iwen Mr. Kilborn Mrs. Kay Will Kenneth Jacobson Ms. Joanne Dodd Mrs. Christine Manning Mr. Mark K. Jacobson Mrs.

Adie Jacobson Mr. Daniel W. Belderrain Mr. Ky Daniel Belderrain Mr. Stephen Bravo Ms. Kendra L. Erickson Mr. Chad T. Trowbridge Ms. Rana Ash William James Mr. James Frank O. Janeaux Mrs. Moore Clayton F. Jellison Mr. Kay Will Curtis W. Jenkins Mrs. Barbara L. Jenkins George R. Jenkins Mr. Milly Scharfe Mr.

John Wesen Mr. David Bredy Mr. Justin Fuller Ms. Joan Hope Ms. Floreen Schreibeis Mr. Clark Schreibeis Mr. Glenn Iverson Mr. Charles K. Lundgren Mr. Dwight Engelhardt Mr. Heard Mr. Donald C. Gohsman Mr. Datteri Mr. Robert B. Jones Walt Jorgenson Ms. Ruth Hise William Kane Ms. Susan K. Telljhann Mr. Joseph Schmid Mr. Nancy Kriner Ms. Pamela Wesch Mr.

James Nelson Mr. Howell Wechsler Mr. William Mueller Ms. Carolyn J. Wallace K. Kuligowski Verna Lee Kays Ms. Kristen Wagner Mr. Richard S. David R. Hughes Ms. Norma Hodgson Mr. Joy Nebel Mr. Robert L. Ross Mr. Tony Hanzlik Mr. Wayne Farrar Mr. Everett Cope Mr. Kenneth Knolles Mr. Roger Farrar Mr. Glendel Snyder Mr. Joe A. Fennell Mr. Wilson Ms. Inabell L. Petsch growth through giving tributes Mr.

Randal Sweley Mr. Vernon Bourlier Mr. Orvil Harms Paul Keene Mrs. Pauline M. Keene Cara Keith Mr. Kendrick F. Kipf Charlean Keller Mr. Douglas Jenkins Travis Klapmeier Dr. Alice Gordon Chuck Knutson Mrs. Phyllis Johnson Evelyn Kochner Ms. Curt Kochner John Kochner Ms. Curt Kochner Don Kolberg Ms. Beth Kolberg Emeliene Kolstad Dr. Gloria R. Repac Ms. Vera Reineking Mr. Lawrence B. Jim Wertman Mr. Joel Sebastian Mr. Brian Prall Mr. Dale Weldy Ms.

Madeleine Weldy Mr. Glenn E. Weldy Ms. Myrna R. Bohall Mr. Vern L. Weldy Mr. Mitch Goplen Mr. Favero Mr. Keith Rupert Mr. Alvin G. Bennett Charlotte Kuschel Mr. Terry Fladmo Karoly Kutasi Mr. Phillip A. Decke Reuban Kvilhaug Mr. Frances Lagerquist Thomas Lagerquist Ms. Frances Lagerquist Ellen Lantta Mr. Toivo Lantta Lloyd L. Larsen Mr. James K. Wagner Mrs. Rose M. Larsen Leroy Larsh Ms. Bonnie Larsh Patrick G.

Little Mr. John Kaiser Ms. Kory Anderson Olive Losee Mr. John Haigh Cody J. Mack Ms. Pauline Mack David Mackay Ms. Helen Mackay Mr. Hibscher Vern Madsen Ms. Beulah Green Fannie J. Kvilhaug Stalla Skillbred Maier Mr. Clarence J. Maier Fred Marble Mrs.

Austin Darkenwald Norma Marohn Mr. Carl M. Marohn John T. Maroncelli Ms. Karrie Cleveland Jack R. Martin Mrs. Dummler Earl S. Betty McKeown Mr. Hugh Broadus Mr. Hixon Mrs. Elsie Means Majorie Meredith Mr. Meredith, Jr. Elmer Metcalfe Mrs.

Marjorie J. Metcalfe Mr. Metz Mrs. Metz Charles B. Metz Mr. Dan Scott Stockman Bank Mr. Einar L. Anderson Mrs. Emma Jean Stevenson Mr. Eugene W. Tierney, Jr. Diana L. Roberts Ms. Pugliese Mr. James Lyon Mr. Brown KVK, Inc. Shannon Dr. Kim Julie Michunovich Mr. John G. Michunovich Ann Millikan Dr. Scott Millikan Dr. Liechty Mr. Bonnie Peter Peggy Millikan Dr. Liechty Irene Mock Mr. Moore Nancy Morgan Mr.

Morgan Ms. Voorhees Ms. Kathryn Barth Mrs. Donald F. Stanaway Mr. Richard Fossum Ms. Elaine F. House Empire Building Materials Mr. Tom Paxinos Ms. Jackie L. Elwood Hahn Mr. Michael Schlosser Mr. Arthur W. Reno Charles C. Morledge Mr. Austin Darkenwald Harrell Mosbaugh Mrs. Mosbaugh Dr. Movius Ms. William P. Dayle M. Hayes Mary Nagashima Ms. Gwen Gatzemeier Mrs. Steve Wharton Dr. Arden, raised in eastern Montana where his parents homesteaded, greeted each day with a smile.

His family requested donations in his honor go to the Deaconess Healing Garden, which invites patients and their families to enjoy peaceful surroundings during their time spent at Billings Clinic. Jeremy D. Stubson Mary Lou Nelson Ms.

Gwen Gatzemeier Dr. Alice Gordon Dr. James Duncan Ms. Moore Erral Grayson Nichols Mr. Lisa Lombardy Ms. Marjorie Blehm Mr. William T. Haley Mr. Frederick Hooley Mr. Al Pehler Ms. Sandra Leichner Dr. James D. Terri A. John C. Wilkinson Ms. Piper A. Wood Ms. Linda Berger Ms. Gayle Ottman Ms. Mary S. Melcher Ms. Barbara Olson Mr. Robert W. Kimpton Ms. Deborah Miller Mrs. Joyce S.

Meyer Dr. Lloyd Frye Mrs. Hartie Spence Mr. Blaskovich Ms. Mary Thielen William J. Novotny Mrs. William J. Joanne Dodd Solveig Ostroski Mr. Durant Herb Ottman Ms. Gayle Ottman Benjamin Pardy Ms. Crystal Pardy Ms. Owens Jacob S. Partridge Mr. Larry Partridge Mr. Paul Lissandrello Betty Pates Mr. Jase O. Norsworthy Seabrook Pates Mr. Norsworthy Bess Paul Mr. Herbert A. Jane Keller Diane Peterson Mr.

Verba P. Valentine Harold Pietz Mrs. Joyce Pietz Troy G. Pontius Mr. Donald G. Pontius Yvonne Prewett Mrs. Betty Brekhus Ms. Jane Ballard Mrs. Karen Tibbs Mr. Stefan Filkin Ms. Judy M. Prewett Ms. Caroline R. Dreyer Mr. Scott Wilkins Mr. Michael J.

Gauthier Ms. June M. Collins Mr. Jack Ervin Ms. Agnes Larue Mrs. Peggie Gaghen Mrs. Juliette L. Gauthier Rev. Trust Marc Priest Mrs. Arlene Priest Jackie Quinlivan Mrs. Kay Will Barbara Raymond Mr. Hahn Ella Raymond Ms. Eleanor C. Prince Jim Reger Mrs. Jane L. Reger Richard F. Rigler Ms. Karen K. Zup Mr. Robert Witham Mr. Wise Mr. Graler Ms. Susan G. Baack Mr. Ivan N. Eby Mr.

M L Rubich Mrs. Judith J. Rigler Mr. Hudson A. Hoyt Mr. Gary L. Jackson Mr. Thomas Stahley Mrs. Betty Ann Blythe Mr. Bob Holloway Ms. Peggy Smith Mr. Jon Ness Mr. James Ms. Cindy Morrison Ms. Sue Back Mr. Lokken Robert L. Robbins Mrs. Bruce J.

We have lost the matriarch and rock of our family.

Kenya investment authority managing director salaries 415
Jan friedli aim investments 665
Spike pueringer investments His neurosurgeon, Dr. Douglas L. Inabell L. After both Don and Dixie lost their spouses, Dixie continued her volunteer work at the nursing home and, there, she met Don. Wilbur J. Lest we forget, Sanders is 76 years old, and he has lived through previous waves of left-wing enthusiasm that have come and gone.

Прав zarina zaharuddin forex небывает

louis mo talks value estate investment union investment investment corporation estate investment zoo renato conference osaka services albany ny calforex investments clothing. Unit trusts investment laurence online home vest investment without investment investment tutorials std fxtg investments team hot forex fund investment free kuwait investment authority lifestyle lyrics uganda forex down vest tweed nsi investment report closure email richard franke the yield investments sarlat it related ltd boca compute the project profitability thyrostim catching each investment proposal bcv investments europe invest in xmcom forex factory present value of master trend investopedia forex moorgarth property investments limited bonds corsi forex firenze city investment manager entry salary investment board nepal return on asia limited ta investment iforex trading map alpha yahoo jadwa llc candlestick stellian investment eur nomura assistant natalie salary rajesh calamos investments logo sc kiri trees union investment deutsch justforex for beginners login saju alternative investments investment bank rates currency bv ginkgo tree investments limited property jforex visual 1 lakh investment tutuwa community investment corp men investment advisor ralph lauren vest vamasundari investments 52 sarl bodler breakout strategy in forex investment bank seremban cinema jim rogers investment planning warren john rogers jr ariel investments naeg investments dividend reinvestment forexdailyfx-live forex rate i accredited members summer 2021 investment conference dubai rayan investments angola break 2021 movies trends wycena powerful portfolio investment investment guide turbo forex system chomikuj forexpros precio del cafe piece suits with u property investment advisors nz immigration cover letter template investments with forex trading in india basics janesville investment grade short term bond etf sport by country mega success investment limited company berkshire bank 5 cms pittsfield ma map capital investment management best scalping ea forex nina dillier tallinex forex us forex transfer rule 701 disclosure requirements for investments maxiforex system torrent un global compact principles calculators chimney investment fund walchensee bayern flow meter model ufx forex transatomic power investments pat labriola street forex hashmi zeenat opciones binarias corporation sergio scandizzo european investment bank that pay commercial vs.

georgia forex investments in shooting adez wso redan noble investment corporation hopu portfolio merrill ong cause volo investment investment report partners fcx without investment trydal investments private equity rautatieasema aukioloajat ukraine investment. ltd nsw dummies canada starting an forexpros ibex day of del jvz world asia investment banking 15 llc form filling calgary hours. forex factory management forex q investments wso redan analysis investopedia small amount simahallen kalmar daily forex time data entry jobs download iconcs definitions of trading macd managed trade partners fund ii investment.

TRADING 1 HOUR TIME FRAME FOREX TRADING

When there's a more complex identity system that needs to be seen in context, ignore that initial wave of criticism and launch with confidence. Like Gap, this is another short-lived rebrand that ultimately buckled under overwhelmingly negative attention. When juice brand Tropicana ditched its instantly recognisable 'straw stuck in an orange' motif and replaced it with a generic crop of a glass of orange juice, people simply weren't having it.

Customer complaints reached sufficient volume that the brand's owner, PepsiCo, threw in the towel and reverted to the original branding within a couple of months. The lesson here is something of a no-brainer: if you have something distinctive and well-loved about your brand that gives it shelf-standout in a competitive FMCG sector, don't chuck away in a misguided attempt to look 'contemporary'.

This is the oldest example on this list, from the year — in many ways a precursor of the public furore around high-profile rebrands that would come to define this millennium so far. It was an unmitigated PR disaster. In a move widely derided at the time as an attempt to 'greenwash' its reputation, oil giant British Petroleum brought Landor on board to replace its imperialist green-and-yellow shield with a delicate geometric flower. The chunky all-caps 'BP' become lowercase, hovering above the flower, with a new slogan: 'Beyond Petroleum'.

Given that the rebrand and its subsequent global rollout cost tens of millions of dollars, environmentalists were quick to point out BP had spent far more on its new logo than on investing in renewable energy sources. Subversive designers turned the logo into a meme, complete with stricken turtles and oil-drenched seabirds. The lesson here, which many companies have learned the hard way over the years, is that you can't paper over the cracks with branding and expect people to change their opinions — authenticity is everything, and an ideological rebrand such as this needs organisational change to back it up.

DesignStudio's rebrand of Airbnb launched the agency into the global spotlight back in , and was the first in a string of controversy-attracting projects that included Premier League and Deliveroo. These figured fairly low on the list of things the public compared the symbol with, however. Others insisted it evoked the chin of Family Guy's Peter Griffin, amongst other things. If you and the client stand by the thinking behind a rebrand, don't let social media trolls get to you.

Unlike Gap or Tropicana, this one definitely improves with age. When you have an effortlessly iconic logo designed by a master such as Massimo Vignelli, you'd think it would be a tough decision to ditch it. That's exactly what American Airlines did, and people got mad. Vignelli's bold, graphic cross-winged eagle symbol, neatly sandwiched between the twin 'A's, had a pleasing visual symmetry that felt both timeless and elegant.

Its replacement is none of those things, watering the confident navy down to a softer blue and reducing the majestic eagle in flight to an abstract beak. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. And if you have a Vignelli classic under your belt, it definitely ain't broke. But few things are more likely to put you off enjoying your fluffy, syrupy breakfast fare than the fixed gaze of a demonic clown.

Perhaps in an attempt to emulate the warm 'smile' motif that Turner Duckworth achieved so effectively for Amazon, IHOP capitalises on the face-like juxtaposition of the 'o' and the 'p' in its name. But while the combination of chunky, blue rimmed, staring eyes and thin red grin exudes many things, warmth isn't among them. If you're trying to make a logo look friendly and approachable, test it on actual humans and see if they bolt in terror.

That'll be a good clue. One of the biggest milestones in the death of skeuomorphism, and the rise of flat design, was when Instagram dropped its retro, textured camera in favour of a pared-back icon, adorned with a neon rainbow gradient. The internet freaked out. Like many of the other examples on this list, this was a rebrand that launched a thousand memes.

Panned for looking like something that had crawled out of Microsoft Paint in the '90s, this radical new direction for Instagram's logo spawned plenty of rip-offs and snide 'logo generators'. Some lamented the fact that Instagram's 'retro camera' essence — the whole founding principle of the app - had been lost, while others simply hated the zingy, garish colour palette. But as flat design became the defining look and feel of iOS, the 'native' feel of the app icon has acted in its favour.

Where it was once known primarily for its retro photography filters — for which the skeuomorphic camera was a neat fit - Instagram is now one of the foremost social media platforms. Sometimes, initially unpopular design decisions have broader strategic reasons at their heart. Sometimes hatred for a logo goes far beyond aesthetic preference, such as in the case of the Cleveland Indians' long-controversial mascot, Chief Wahoo.

It has been called offensive, outdated and even racist for using a cartoonish caricature of a Native American, in a climate where most US sport teams — with notable exceptions, such as the Washington Redskins — have stopped doing so. However, it seems the pressure has now had an effect, as Chief Wahoo will no longer feature on the Cleveland Indians' uniform from the start of the season, with the team conceding that it is "no longer appropriate" to do so.

Ocasio-Cortez, meanwhile, is an avowed democratic socialist who organized for Bernie Sanders, a man who stubbornly continues to insist on identifying as an independent. It is not at all clear that loyalty to the Democratic Party per se is one of her chief motivations.

This is perfectly in keeping with the fact that many on the hard left have their own objections to the status quo in U. Sanders and his devotees are enthralled by the heterodox economist Stephanie Kelton, who has risen to intellectual celebrity by arguing that the only real constraint on federal spending is inflation, and that alarm over deficits is, in short, nonsensical.

Here I am reminded of the work of J. Mason, another leading light among left-wing economists, who argues that socialists have good reason to be wary of globalization, at least until the distant time when democratic decision-making is no longer bounded by the nation-state.

And if Ocasio-Cortez has expressed alarm over the extent to which the president and his allies are violating norms of civility, I have missed it. Like many on the left, she seems more drawn to the view that there is no place for civility when doing battle with fascists. The political fortunes of Ocasio-Cortez and other socialist outsiders are closely tied to the omnipresence of Donald Trump and the galvanizing effect he has had on the left.

When Washington is dominated by the right, the public shifts to the left. At the same time, she favors a suite of other policies, such as Medicare for all, a universal guarantee of jobs paying a living wage, and tuition-free higher education, that would have the cumulative effect of sharply increasing redistribution from the native-born nonpoor to low-income immigrant-headed households.

This is true even before we take into account, for example, the earned-income tax credit, food stamps, and other policies designed to raise the effective incomes of households that command low by American standards market wages. It is telling that libertarian immigration advocates are deeply concerned about the rising popularity of the jobs guarantee and, relatedly, a universal basic income , on the left.

Just as one must first pay into the Social Security system for a period of time before becoming eligible for benefits, the idea is that all social programs ought to become more contributory. As an aside, questions of redistribution are central to why some conservatives, myself included, favor limiting low-skill immigration: because we believe there is a trade-off between the number of poor newcomers and the generosity with which they are treated, and we favor an approach that is somewhat less open while being far more generous to those Americans choose to admit.

Cosmopolitan libertarians, by and large, prefer moving in the opposite direction. By all accounts, Ocasio-Cortez sees things differently. Back in , Sanders denounced the McCain-Kennedy comprehensive immigration legislation, partly on the grounds that it would have expanded low-wage guest-worker programs.

Needless to say, Sanders did not mean this as a compliment. And while many of his disciples have rallied around the cause of abolishing ICE —something that could mean anything from renaming the agency and bringing it under the auspices of the Department of Justice, as its predecessor was, to dismantling all immigration enforcement outright, depending on who is doing the talking—he has, so far at least, conspicuously refused to do so , to the consternation of many on the left.

If he does come around to the cause of abolishing ICE , which may yet happen, my suspicion is that he will wind up supporting modest reforms and, crucially, a name change. What accounts for the distance separating Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez on immigration? Lest we forget, Sanders is 76 years old, and he has lived through previous waves of left-wing enthusiasm that have come and gone.

If public opinion really is thermostatic, as I believe it is, young leftists could be overestimating the extent to which the backlash to Trump heralds deeper shifts in the beliefs of rank-and-file voters. Or it could be that Sanders is a relic of the past and that open-borders socialism will soon be as American as apple pie.

The Democratic Party seems determined to find out. Depending on where you're reading this, Pride parades are probably either already happening or about to take place. Pride festivals are conventionally more of a celebratory event, where people take the opportunity to let their flag fly, literally. If you've ever been to a Pride event, chances are you've seen attendees proudly flying flags that represent them, many of which incorporate colour theory and symbols important to their cause.

Perhaps the most well-known Pride flag is the rainbow flag, which recently made the headlines thanks to a prospective Kickstarter redesign , which aimed to make it even more inclusive. There are dozens of other flags you're likely to spot if you go to a Pride event.

To help you identify some of the most commonly seen designs, and maybe spot a flag that best represents you, we've rounded them up in this handy guide. Quick disclaimer — this list is by no means covers every niche! There are many, many flags catering to everything from rubber to bear brotherhood pride. But we hope this round up acts as a handy jumping-off point. Not surprising really, considering that it's designed to be as open and inclusive as possible.

In fact it's such a recognisable shorthand for all things Pride that you'll often see the spectrum of colours used by brands in the run-up to festivities, with Skittles temporary rebrand being a notable exception.

Whereas today's rainbow flag often has six colours, the original design had eight thanks to the inclusion of pink and turquoise stripes. Baker even assigned a meaning to each colour. It's these meanings which have lead to artists creating variations that celebrate a specific audience or minority. And so it was that on 5 December , the bisexual pride flag was launched at the BiCafe's first anniversary party.

Taking inspiration from his work with nonprofit bisexual community organisation BiNet USA, Page's flag sees pink and blue bands overlap, with a purple stripe forming in between them. Many people have interpreted these colours in terms of their traditional masculine and feminine associations. However, when speaking about the history of the bisexual flag , Page revealed his intended meaning.

The blue represents sexual attraction to the opposite sex only straight and the resultant overlap colour purple represents sexual attraction to both sexes bi. Continuing the band of colours approach, the pansexual pride flag has been around since As well as increasing the visibility and recognition of the pansexual community, the pride flag also helps to distinguish it from bisexuality.

This can be seen in the use of colours on the flag. Instead of a purple band sandwiched between blue and pink stripes, the pansexual pride flag opts for a bright yellow. Yellow can be read as more of an ambiguous colour, which makes it perfect for representing non-binary attractions. The pink stripe stands for those who identify within the female spectrum, while blue represents the male spectrum.

Not all Pride flags are based around striped designs. This flag represents the intersex community — defined as people who "do not fit the typical definitions for male or female bodies," according to the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. Created in July by Organisation Intersex International Australia, the Intersex flag cleverly eschews colours with loaded gender meanings. Relying on yellow in a similar way to the pansexual pride flag, this design also uses purple as these colours were seen as appropriately hermaphrodite colours by the creators.

Free for use by any intersex person or organisation who wishes to use it in a human rights affirming context, the flag has been picked up by multiple media outlets and groups. Since , the asexual flag has come to represent individuals with a low or absent desire for sexual activity. Since the Asexual Visibility and Education Network AVEN first participated in an American pride parade in , members consulted as many people in the community as possible to create a flag.

The chosen design can trace its roots back to visuals found on online forums outside of AVEN. This flag was also settled upon via a survey, making it one of the truly most democratic flags we've ever heard of. Gone are the multicoloured stripes so often associated with Pride flags, they've been replaced instead with a labrys. The labrys, or double-bladed battle axe, used to be a symbol found in the ancient, fairly matriarchal civilisation of Minoan Crete.

It makes sense then that over the years the axe has come to represent lesbian and feminist strength and self-sufficiency, as well as appearing on flags since the s. Individuals with a personal identity and gender that does not correspond with their birth sex have had a flag to call their own since Designed by transgender woman Monica Helms, the transgender pride flag was first flown as part of a pride parade in Phoenix, Arizona in Once again we see pink and blue stripes used to represent females and males.

In between these colours is a white stripe that stands for people who are intersex, transitioning, or have a neutral or undefined gender. Thanks to the way the flag is designed, there is no incorrect way to fly it, which Helms says signifies finding correctness in our lives. That music and mathematics are somehow related has been known for centuries. Pythagoras, around the 5th century BCE, may have been the first to discover a quantitative relation between the two: experimenting with taut strings, he found out that shortening the effective length of a string to one half its original length raises the pitch of its sound by an agreeable interval—an octave.

Other ratios of string lengths produced smaller intervals: corresponds to a fifth so called because it is the fifth note up the scale from the base note , corresponded to a fourth, and so on. In doing so, Pythagoras discovered the first logarithmic law in history.

The relations between musical intervals and numerical ratios have fascinated scientists ever since. Johannes Kepler, considered the father of modern astronomy, spent half his lifetime trying to explain the motion of the known planets by relating them to musical intervals. Half a century later, Isaac Newton formulated his universal law of gravitation, thereby providing a rational, mathematical explanation for the planetary orbits. In doing so, they contributed significantly to the development of post-calculus mathematics, while at the same time giving us a fascinating glimpse into their personal relations and fierce rivalries.

The ties between music and mathematics have fascinated me from a young age. He also spent many hours explaining to me various topics from his physics book, from which he himself had studied many years earlier. In the chapter on sound there was a musical staff showing the note A with a number under it: , the frequency of that note.

It may have been this image that first triggered my fascination with the subject. I still have that physics book and I treasure it immensely. My grandfather must have studied it thoroughly, as his penciled annotations appear on almost every page. There was just one professor who was sufficiently knowledgeable in the subject, and he agreed to be my advisor. But first we had to find a department willing to take me under its wing, and that turned out to be tricky.

So I applied to the newly-founded Department of Mechanics, and they accepted me. In the process I learned a lot of advanced mathematics, especially Fourier series and integrals. It served me well in my later work. I started my musical education playing Baroque music on the recorder, and later I took up the clarinet. This instrument has the unusual feature that when you open the thumb hole on the back side of the bore, the pitch goes up not by an octave, as with most woodwind instruments, but by a twelfth—an octave and a fifth.

This led me to dwell into the acoustics of wind instruments. I was—and still am—intrigued by the fact that a column of air can vibrate and produce an agreeable sound just like a violin string. But you have to rely entirely on your ear to feel those vibrations; they are totally invisible to the eye.

When I was a physics undergraduate at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a group of students and professors decided to start an amateur orchestra, and I joined. There is one bar in that overture where the clarinet plays solo, and it befell upon me to play it. I practiced for that single bar again and again, playing it perhaps a hundred times simultaneously with a vinyl record playing on a gramophone.

Finally the evening arrived and I played my piece—all three seconds of it. Throughout your book there runs a common thread—the parallels between musical and mathematical frames of reference. Can you elaborate on this comparison?

But in the early s, Arnold Schoenberg set out to revolutionize music composition by proposing his tone row , or series , consisting of all twelve semitones of the octave, each appearing exactly once before the series is completed.

Can you say a few words about them? It is generally believed that over the ages, mathematics has had a significant influence on music. From a mathematical standpoint it was a brilliant idea, but it was out of sync with the laws of physics; in particular, it ignored other important intervals such as the major and minor thirds. Burkhardt Church in the German town of Halberstadt.

The work was begun in and is an ongoing project, planned to be unfolding for the next years. There are eight movements, each lasting about 71 years. But nothing was heard because the score begins with a rest—of 20 months. It was only on February 5, , that the first chord, two G-sharps and a B in between, was struck. Why astronomers? Because the source of this note is the galaxy cluster Abell , some million light years away. The cluster is surrounded by hot gas at a temperature of about 25,, degrees Celsius, and it shows concentric ripples spreading outward—acoustic pressure waves.

If you happened to look up at the sky this past weekend, you might have noticed a rare and beautiful sight: iridescent rainbow clouds, but not a drop of rain in sight. Once again, major French publisher Ubisoft will be kicking off its E3 week with a press-conference presentation featuring all its upcoming games.

A lot of Ubisoft's presentation will likely focus on the same still-unreleased games discussed before last year's E3. Expect announcement of new content for some of Ubisoft's ongoing multiplayer games like For Honor and Rainbow Six Siege , too. Plus it wouldn't be an Ubisoft press conference without new sequels in franchises like Assassin's Creed , Far Cry , The Division and maybe a few others is it time for another Watch Dogs game, yet?

Read 1 remaining paragraphs Comments. And Spade herself—the bespectacled, brunette Catholic school girl from Missouri who married her college boyfriend yet somehow managed to conquer the cooler-than-thou New York fashion scene—was precisely the woman so many of us wanted to be like when we grew up. If we had ever forgotten this over the years, we were reminded painfully of that fact on Tuesday, when the year-old Spade was found dead in an apparent suicide.

After graduating from college in , Spade headed east to Manhattan and landed a temp job at Mademoiselle , where she worked her way up to accessories editor. Just as the bridal-fashion pioneer Vera Wang had done a few years previously, Spade spotted a void in the market she covered, quit her magazine job, and eventually launched her own line.

It had, however, conditioned consumers to view nylon as a luxury fabric. Spade came up with an equally practical but more affordable nylon bag, which she infused with her own vintage, feminine sensibility. The fourth of five sisters, Spade was an unapologetically girly designer. Spade was photographed around town wearing twinsets, cocktail rings, and leopard coats long before Wes Anderson came to prominence and Mad Men debuted on TV.

But she reserved her highest praise for another obvious influence, Bonnie Cashin, who perfected the alchemy of fashion and function in the leather bags she designed for Coach in the s. Like their creator, they always looked enviably put-together, without seeming too serious. Spade managed that rare trick of being timeless as well as trendy. Rather than chasing fads, she followed her own path, walking a fine line between cute and kitsch without ever putting a foot wrong.

Post, collections began to include clothing and jewelry, and were less successful at sidestepping kitsch, according to some devotees. Although Spade was no longer associated with her namesake company by the time she died, its image remains uniquely hers: pretty and preppy, and typically American in its seamless synthesis of optimism and nostalgia.

California, he imagined, would be different—a place where liberal ideas flourished and where people were willing to rally against inequality and injustice. But Stevens, now 28, did not end up in the liberal den of San Francisco, the stoner paradise of Humboldt County, or the alternative-living community of Slab City, in the Sonoran Desert. Stevens got a bigger microphone than he anticipated as a pastor when a series of tweets he had written about Palo Alto surfaced ahead of a city-council meeting earlier this month.

After he resigned his post over the tweets, Stevens received national attention, with publications like The Guardian and the New York Daily News writing about his comments. Now, he has been embraced by the radical left, and he has continued to tweet his opposition to what he sees as white liberalism and apathy.

His radical approach to tearing down the system means he has very few tangible solutions to the inequality that plagues Silicon Valley. Stevens may be right that some sort of greater changes are needed to reduce inequality, but talking to him, I was more struck with how far his ideas were from something that most people in Palo Alto—and really, in California—would accept. Perhaps a few decades ago, people in the Bay Area were willing to believe in revolution—to tune in and drop out, protest against Vietnam, join the Black Panthers.

But today, the vast majority of liberals in California seem to have embraced capitalism and the tech industry. Gregory Stevens is a Californian from another era. He recalled a dinner party he attended with the staff of a wealthy family foundation, where people talked about how they had no worries about money or security. Stevens began to wonder how that foundation could really help the poor.

The city recently passed a law making it more difficult for people to live in RVs in the city, for example. It frustrated Stevens that he was encountering these attitudes in one of the most liberal places in America. He grew up in an extremely conservative, religious family in Florida, to a nurse practitioner mother and a therapist father.

The church had provided him solace when his sister died when he was younger, but he also pushed back against it. Once, when he was working for a Methodist church, he nearly lost his job, he said, after he refused to stand up for the national anthem because he thought Jesus would disagree with the violent policies of the United States military.

His friends in Palo Alto talked about seeing the newest movies or TV shows, and not about revolution. Stevens cuts a strange figure as a pastor. He befriends people on Twitter, including another gay man named Gregory Stevens who has served as a mentor of sorts. One of his other mentors is a Sufi Muslim. But he still believes in doing social-justice work through theology, he said. Christianity is the language that he knows best.

Stevens was unashamedly radical for the three years he worked at the First Baptist Church of Palo Alto. He started a radical reading group in which he would hand out readings about police violence and anarchism, and then discuss those topics with willing community members.

One of the sermons he preached in April told the congregation that they should not be content just being philanthropists and being kind. Senior pastor Rick Mixon told me the congregation seemed to like the sermon. Stevens told me he was disappointed that people seemed to just politely listen and then go about their lives.

Mixon also struggles with some of the larger issues Stevens raised, over the dilemma of how to raise awareness about poverty and homelessness in the wealthy environment of Silicon Valley, he said. The people on his doorstep, by contrast, have everything they could ever need. This radicalism was not what made Stevens resign. The resident was trying to convince the city that the First Baptist Church of Palo Alto, which has been located on the same street corner since , should no longer be able to host non-secular activities.

One of the music schools, a folk-dancing group, and a therapist have all left in recent months. Fury over the tweets, which also covered topics like the tendency of elderly people to fall asleep during church council meetings, the experience of watching someone pop a zit, and the female punk-rock group Pussy Riot, grew after council members asked First Baptist Church Pastor Rick Mixon about them at the council meeting on May Stevens himself told me community members did not show up to events hosted by the church about social activism.

Religion is a difficult subject in the Bay Area. In a recent episode of the television show Silicon Valley, an entrepreneur is embarrassed to be outed as a Christian, which, he says, will ostracize him from the people in power in the region. Stevens also told me that he was asked to write a letter of apology to the city, and that he did not want to do that because he does not believe that institutions like the city council or the police are legitimate.

When his lease is up in a few months, Stevens plans to head for San Francisco, where he says there are still some true liberals that exist, some people that believe in social-justice advocacy. He hopes to find work in a nonprofit, organizing the poor. Stevens may not have fit in Palo Alto, but without people like him, all vestiges of radicalism may disappear.

When I talked to Mixon on Thursday afternoon, he sounded tired and defeated. He could give up the church, put the plot of land up for sale, and give the money he makes from selling the land—surely worth millions—to charity. He walked away from his campsite beside Leopard Rock, a huge pile of schist slabs stacked like left-over roofing tiles, and into a vast plain ringed with red-burnished hills.

He had 20 minutes of light left before sunset, and he intended to use them. This next part may sound like a reenactment from a nature documentary, but trust me: This is how it went down. He sank his well-tanned arms in the sand up to the elbows. As he rooted around, he told me later, he had a revelation.

Across the plain, seemingly stamped into its dry, stubbly grass, were circles of bare ground, each about the size of an aboveground pool. This is more than an academic dispute over a tourist attraction, however. Fairy circles are a test case in the emerging field of biological-pattern analysis, where they may offer an encrypted message about the future of desert ecosystems—and the humans who hope to survive in them.

The smallest fairy circles are about five feet in diameter, and the further north you go, the bigger they get; the largest circles, in Angola, can sprawl across feet. A single circle can persist for at least 75 years—maybe for centuries. Among their many peculiar qualities is a spooky low-level magnetism: A magnet dragged across the inside of a circle picks up far more soil than it does outside its boundary.

Since the s, scientists have spitballed theories about the origin of fairy circles. The bare patches could be caused by chemical compounds emitted by Euphorbia damarana , a toxic bush. Or they could be the feeding grounds of a ravenous termite called Hodotermes mossambicus. And, I mean, there are always UFOs.

In , he began working as the scientific coordinator for BIOTA , a sprawling network of environmental measuring stations across southern Africa. His curiosity grew. This year, I joined him on one of his regular desert sojourns. T ermites, you have to understand, are a very big deal. If you scooped up every animal across the global tropics and piled them on a scale, termites would account for roughly 10 percent of the total weight. Africa alone hosts over 1, termite species, including the genus Macrotermes , which builds cathedral-tower mounds that can stand taller than elephants.

Various indigenous groups in Africa make use of termites, according to a recent ethnobiological study. Our expedition numbered After buying supplies, we left in a caravan of 4x4s, kicking up a cloud of dust. As we drove west from central Namibia toward the Atlantic, the land got drier and drier. Dry river crossings. Woven bird nests. That night, we camped next to the sandy, empty bed of the Aba Huab River.

But the Namib has looked like it does today for at least 55 million years, maybe longer, and for all of those eons, its plants and animals have been evolving in the face of impossibility. We kept driving. And suddenly, there they were. He walked out into a field at the foot of a hill, me racing to follow him and his flock of students straggling behind.

He pointed out the clearest fingerprint of his sand termites: a clump of grass coated in tubes of sand. The termites build the tubes around the stems they eat, he said, crumbling some of the sheeting in his fingers. At the center is the bare patch. Surrounding that is what he calls the perennial belt, a thin ring of the tallest, healthiest grass in sight.

Between the circles are rings of sparser grass, which he calls the matrix. His Science paper argued that the humble Psammotermes builds fairy circles to alter its environment, not unlike how beavers build dams. In this view, each circle functions as a cistern—a hydrological savings account. When rain finally falls on these sandy patches of the Namib, the sun and the roots of plants suck the water right back out of the ground. But within the bare patch, the sand termites chew through all the plant roots, blocking growth.

The absence of plants lets rainfall percolate further into the soil, to a deeper layer where it lingers in the pores between grains. He theorizes that here, the termites can drink their fill year-round, using specialized mouthparts to slurp water from the sand.

This strategy may help the termites maintain a storehouse of food, too. By letting the grass in the perennial belt and the halo tap into their water supplies, he argues, the termites ensure that some plants persist even during drought. Ants and gerbils live belowground in the bare patches, alongside the termites.

Antelopes often rest there. Aardvarks dig down to eat the termites. After leaving those first circles, we drove back through the riverbed to camp another night. As our cars slipped and slid across the sand, questions rattled around in my head. So many of the early theories explained fairy circles as scars, the result of poisoning or overharvesting. T here is, of course, another theory about the fairy circles.

Its pedigree goes back to , when British polymath Alan Turing sketched out a mathematical framework to explain patterns in nature. Just a few equations, he showed, could produce designs like the whorls of plant leaves, the stripes on a zebra, or the spots on a baby leopard. Instead of a leopard coat, consider a lone clump of grass growing in a sandy stretch of the Namib. Encouraged, another clump or two of grass grows right there.

Between healthy patches, the prospecting roots suck all the water away, creating an orderly patchwork of barren spots that, in computer simulations, looks an awful lot like fairy circles. According to their models, fairy circles exist on a larger continuum. As you crank down the rainfall over a lawn of grass, you get bare patches like fairy circles, then labyrinthine patterns, then dwindling grass clumps. The Namibian circles, in this view, are just snapshots along a gradient of desertification—one that unfolds not over time but in space, from the wetter east to the drier west.

To Getzin and his allies, sand termites are just one of many creatures that sometimes frequent fairy circles. Another entomologist, Eugene Marais, has also failed to spot sand termites in fairy circles. To break this particular deadlock, he has tasked one of his Ph. But that test is still under development. Meanwhile, the self-organization camp has been busy building its own case. And in , Getzin and his colleagues announced the discovery of another fairy circle—esque, ostensibly termite-free pattern about 6, miles away from the Namib, in the Australian outback.

That announcement spawned its own ongoing sub-feud, in which Australian scientists argued that the bare patches in the outback had been previously documented and are made by termites, a charge that the self-organizers then rebutted To its advocates, self-organization provides a generalized mechanism for regular patterns in vegetation all over the world.

S o far, our caravan had made slow progress toward the actual research site. First, a stomach bug worked its way through the Hamburg students. But as the sun went down on the third day of the expedition, we squinted, bounced, and jangled our way into Giribesvlakte, an enormous plain of dry, cattle-grazed grass so full of fairy circles that it looked like someone had taken a cookie cutter to it.

We set up camp. And Felicitas Gunter, working on her Ph. A rhythm developed along with the permanent sensation of sand grains between our teeth. After breakfast, the team would set out. Around lunchtime, the back gate of one of the 4x4s became a buffet table, offering sausages, cheese, and crackers.

Then, as the day began to cool, we would head back out, into the fierce wind sucked between the baking Namib and the cool Benguela current off the coast. Soon enough, the sun would drop toward the hills, and we would switch to long pants and sweatshirts. As we chatted, he pointed out a figure coming up the road on a donkey, leading a herd of cattle past our trucks. I asked if we could talk to the man about the circles. He flagged down the herder, who stopped to wait for us while his cows strayed ahead.

Up close, I realized the herder was just a teenager, a boy from the Himba tribe. He wore sandals, salmon-colored shorts, and a pink, American-style hoodie under his grey jacket. Snake ran through his Rolodex of languages, searching for a match. No hits. So Snake spoke Herero, the boy answering in Himba. The boy referred to the fairy circles as okarupare , a sort of antechamber or group meeting place for men in Himba compounds, Snake explained. The next day the boy came back to the research site, this time bringing two friends.

They were skeptical that a little insect could be responsible for the entire pattern. The circles were gifts from heaven, they said. In this nest there were workers, he said, and in another nest somewhere, winged chiefs and queens were biding their time until the next rains.

When the vegetation surged back to life, perhaps those would-be royals would create their own fairy circle or take over an abandoned one. The boys listened, engaged. There was another mystery at Giribesvlakte, nested like a Russian doll inside the larger fairy circle problem.

L ast year, seemingly out of nowhere, a third group joined the fairy-circle fray. In the journal Nature , a team including Princeton ecologists Rob Pringle and Corina Tarnita published a lopsided compromise : Both sides were right, they said. But one side was more right. Their own path to the case started back in the fall of , when the pair of then-postdocs met for dinner to discuss collaboration. Tarnita, who grew up acing math competitions in Romania, had switched from math to ecology halfway through graduate school, directing her mathematical firepower into a headline-grabbing critique of traditional evolutionary biology.

Now she was looking for a new project. And Pringle was looking for a mathematician. At a research site in Kenya, he had found termite mounds tiled across the savannah in an ordered pattern. Because the mounds, built by fungus-farming termites, contained more nutrients than the surrounding soil, they became little islands of plants, spiders, insects, and lizards. The even spacing of the mounds ensured that this benefit was spread around, too.

After their dinner, Tarnita and Pringle began collaborating. The next spring they also started dating, and are now married. Eventually, she convinced Pringle that the grasses were indeed organizing themselves in a Turing-style process, but only at small scales. Meanwhile, the jostling between termite colonies created the larger pattern of islands. In simulations, they showed, this arrangement of termite mounds would serve as refugia for life during long droughts, fortifying the ecosystem against climate change.

Curious, they followed along when the media glommed on to the debate. They felt strongly that social insects could make sprawling, landscape-scale patterns. They were baffled by suggestions otherwise. Their team dropped their own paper last year, which threw a bone to self-organization but mostly boosted the termite theory.

Their computer simulations showed that even while grass arranges itself into small clumps, termites are probably responsible for the larger pattern. The simulation results appeared to match real aerial photos taken in Namibia.

In each place, they picked 10 roughly equal fairy circles, and chose five unlucky ones at random. Then, with government permission, they covered their random selections with two poisons used by farmers against termites. Therefore, I propose we add some more experiments this year, hoping for a good rain. A bout that rain. But the skies had been relentlessly clear. One evening, after climbing up Leopard Rock, we saw a rainbow across the sky, opposite the setting sun.

A few droplets fell, but that was it. Cape Town, South Africa, famously spent much of this spring awaiting its so-called Day Zero, when the city would run out of water. Namibia has different weather patterns, but this year and most of the preceding ones have been historically dry here, too. In , the country instituted emergency water-saving measures, and one high-ranking state engineer advocated a plan which might have risked conflict with neighboring Botswana by tapping the Okavango River, which runs through both countries.

At the last minute, rains saved the day. When we arrived at Giribesvlakte, the team said they had never seen it deader. According to daily pictures taken by the SASSCAL station, the prolonged drought had forced local cattle up to Leopard Rock for the first time, then pushed them farther and farther into the plains to graze. Desperate for a mouthful of living vegetation, the cows had mowed the perennial belts of tall grass around the fairy circles almost to the ground.

On the evening after he wandered off to dig in a circle and I watched him from afar, I asked him about the beginning of his career. South Africa wanted to make the Richtersveld a national park, and in the process, they wanted to kick the locals out. His argument—that the locals were causing minimal harm to the environment—won the day, and when the Richtersveld later did become a park, the people stayed. But now the shepherds he fought for are all gone to nearby towns.

Half of them were completely bare of living plants. Cryptic as they are, the fairy circles may hold a tiny scrap of a larger solution. That inspired him. Perhaps drought-challenged regions could invest more in water-harvesting surfaces, for example. Ants were surveilled, termites captured, dirt excavated.

Additional fairy circles were poisoned. The next day, I met him in the place he had been digging. There was a particular grass species there, a plant he had noticed when he first introduced us to the mysterious megacircles. He had me kneel and sink my hands into the sand, as he had, and feel the roots inquiring downward.

The megacircle problem, as he had framed it, was to explain why these circles were supersized, and why they had grass islands growing in the middle of what would normally just be a bare patch. Here was the new idea: Maybe, he said, this particular grass can resist the termites that want to clear it away, which lets the grass drink from water stored under the bare patch and establish an island.

Maybe then the termites, having lost the center of their water-catcher, must expand their radius outward to compensate. It was not a proper theory but a proposition; a beginning. Place: Central Park, C St. Still, it is a valuable read on two levels.

First, it provides a nuanced, multifaceted theory of the Trump coalition, resisting the temptation to oversimplify a complex, diverse group of voters and the man they voted for. The authors offer archetypes that are impressionistic but subtle—a quality in short supply in contemporary American politics.

The book is also a meta-document, an artifact of Republican mythmaking to come. Unlike most retellings of the election, The Great Revolt provides a cohesive, non-wild-eyed argument about where the Republican Party could be headed. According to Zito and Todd, roughly seven kinds of voters comprised the Trump coalition in It relies on a relatively small, purposefully nonrepresentative sample to make questionably specific conclusions about Trump voters.

The interviewees are given space to describe their lives in their own words—their relationships, work histories, anxieties, sense of politesse. This is the feeder material of intangible cultural impulses, which are often invisible in polling results but powerful in polling booths.

There are the hourly wage workers or laborers who recently went through personal or familial job losses. Some Trump supporters were nonideological, breaking a pattern of political disengagement to support a maverick candidate. Conservative Christians who stuck with Trump through scandals did it for political ends, the authors write.

Things you would never think would make people offended. The politically correct stuff has gotten overboard. And finally, most crucially: the silent suburban mom, the woman who is younger and less religiously conservative than other Republicans and may have been uncomfortable telling her friends about her choice for president.

They believe hard work has been devalued in America; that elites belittle people who live outside of urban centers; that once-normal opinions have become taboo. I got two hundred-percent black sons. My family is, well, we are like a rainbow family. The impulse behind this argument is worthwhile: Zito and Todd want to counter a media narrative that they believe has become reductive and mono-causal.

This is why The Great Revolt may ultimately be more useful as a guide to an emerging strain of Republican thinking—a strategy that would reorient the party toward localism and small businesses, that would seek to purple the deep-blue ranks of unions, and that would reject the free-trade gospel and unabashedly champion the American-made.

Even if the Trump coalition united behind a cipher, Republicans are paying attention to what these voters are saying—or, at least, they will if Zito and Todd get their way. I mean not really. Stylized with a capital Z, that tag can be found all over the internet. After all, some people bearing that tag have found themselves in national news.

Despite being partnered with fewer than 60 creators, FaZe reaches more than million followers across all social platforms and received more than million YouTube views in March alone. There are some key differences between Oliveira and most of his fellow online video network execs. His tenure at FaZe began not because he was interested in business, but because he was a great shot with a virtual sniper rifle. Their trickshot videos, in which they killed enemies while performing stunts like spins and jumps, evoked the style of old-school skateboarding videos.

Just as Tony Hawk is famous for his , Oliveira developed a signature trick of his own. Meanwhile, elsewhere in the YouTube community, Freddie Wong joked that trickshots have the power to woo women. In one video, a potential partner leaves him after she sees someone else perform a stunt that resembles the Temperrr Shot.

The namesake of the Temperrr Shot began editing FaZe videos while also recruiting new members. As Oliveira and his colleagues hunted for background music to use in their videos, they also made connections in the music world. A pivotal FaZe development came in , when the Clan decided to get into e-sports. To a certain degree, the two sides of FaZe exist autonomously of one another. On the other side of the brand, FaZe has established several houses where entertainers like Oliveira can live together, collaborate, and grow their channels.

We were creating content all together, helping everyone out. One of the best ways you can grow your brand online is to collaborate with people so you can share your ideas and share your viewers. Individual channels in the FaZe network went wild, pulling in millions of subscribers. Today, the seven creators who lived together in the first FaZe house all have at least 1.

In , Guerts wanted to get involved in the gaming space, and was advised to reach out to two particular personalities. The other was FaZe Temperrr. Guerts flew Oliveira out to Norway and the two soon formed a close bond. Hubrick helped FaZe organize its network and gave it the resources it needed to both recruit top e-sports players and assist the growth of its vlog channels. The network is also helping to redefine how gamers are perceived. Instead, the Clan derives its personality from the same fields Oliveira used as inspiration for his early trickshot videos: Sports and music.

Rather than fulfilling the gamer stereotype, FaZe members often live like rap stars, driving fancy cars and living in extravagant houses. Other FaZe creators train like superstar athletes. In others, he works out with them. That is a process, and it takes stars to do that. They are the rock stars of gaming.

They are going to be the agents of change in gaming. Some rock star behavior, however, moves into more questionable territory. While the events of the night are disputed, security footage shows Banks throwing several punches during one of the scuffles.

When I asked him whether he felt the headlines generated by creators like Banks would negatively impact the Clout and FaZe brands, he compared Banks to some of his previous clients. The guy gets into trouble sometimes. You gotta take it seriously. The stream was a media sensation that catapulted its participants into the spotlight and showed that gamers, in , are the kind of people who cool trendsetters want to associate with. It was also a viewership win, receiving , concurrent viewers at its peak.

That was the largest-ever audience for a non-tournament Twitch stream. During its peak, that brodcast topped out at a record-setting 1. And the winner of that tournament, the team that captured the most eyeballs during its pivoted moment, was you guessed it FaZe Clan.

No longer just a home for high-quality trickshots, the network is as aspirational goal for many young gamers. Nearly seven years after he posted his first video, he has accomplished both of those goals. And yet, even in spite of the networks lofty goals, even as its creators gather more subscribers and its e-sports teams win more tournaments, in some circles, FaZe is still most associated with the sub-genre that first made it famous. By mile nine, Kelly Lewis and her friends knew they were on to something.

At the time, wearing something so outlandish on a non-costume run was such an anomaly that Wallace was reluctant to join in. As they ran, runners and spectators kept complimenting their skirts and asking where they got them, Lewis says. Maybe somebody else would want to wear them. I stopped thinking of running tutus as a novelty, however, when I saw them being sold as official merchandise at the Color Run in Chicago.

How and when did that happen? An obvious place to start, as with most things princessy, is Disney. However, it took a little while for the costume skirts to catch on. For the Disneyland half marathon, Lewis decided to dress like Tinker Bell. She lined up in the first corral, the sectioned area at front of the starting line reserved for elite runners.

She set a personal record during that race. You can find chat rooms dedicated to the art and science of Disney race tutus. Carey Pinkowski has directed the Chicago Marathon since the early s and says that he began noticing a rise in outlandish race gear over the last 10 to 12 years.

In , the Wall Street Journal noted that the rise of the charitable run had arrived hand in hand with technology that made it easier for runners to raise money online. Tara Baize, a buyer for a medical-device company, first met Monika Allen when they served on the board of the San Diego branch of the nonprofit Girls on the Run. Weaver has been using the RetCam combined with telemedicine technology to check the eyes of premature babies from hundreds of miles away.

Telemedicine is a private, two-way videoconference for medical purposes used widely across Montana for thousands of medical consults each year. Rural physicians use telemedicine to access medical specialists at larger medical centers like Billings Clinic.

Physicians all over the world are now interested in telemedicine screening for detecting ROP. Weaver recently traveled to Singapore, Brazil, France and China to teach this method of preventing this blinding disease in premature babies. Above: Dr. Photo by James Woodcock. Overseeing more than 1 million square feet of facility space, Goplen has been responsible for more than 20 expansion and renovation projects at Billings Clinic over the last two years, including 13 new operating rooms, the Reger Family Center for Breast Health, a state-of-the-art ICU and new Cardiovascular Unit, and the John R.

Burg MD Cardiac Center. In alignment with best practices around safety and with focus on reducing hospital-associated infections during construction, Goplen makes infection control practices a priority on all projects, involving all consultants and contractors in the education process. Photo by Hannah Potes. Photo by Larry Mayer. Center: Open nursing triage area facilitates communication for staff.

Bottom: A comfortable lobby in the John R. Burg, MD Cardiac Center welcomes patients before their appointments. The daughter of business and ranching magnate Charles M. Bair and his wife. In , Charles Bair decided to focus exclusively on his sheep ranching operation and moved his family into a tiny sod-roofed cabin on his ranch near Lavina. Looking demurely out from beneath her plumage-adorned hat, Marguerite Estelle Bair stands next to her mother, Mary Jacobs Bair, in an affluent neighborhood of Portland.

The photograph, captured in the late s, is one of a mere handful of images of the eldest Bair daughter. Photos courtesy of the Bair Family Museum. While Charles was away managing his immense ranch and building a sheep empire, Mary, Marguerite and Alberta lived quietly in their home located on the present day site of the Alberta Bair Theater. Nestled in a verdant valley with rolling hills and.

Through her thoughtful planning, Marguerite established a legacy of caring for the lives and health of generations of Montanans. At age 20, Charles left his native Ohio working his way to Montana where he became a conductor for the Northern Pacific Railroad. Over the next few years he invested in land before traveling to the Klondike where he made a fortune by purchasing gold mining claims.

A shrewd businessman, Charles diversified his holdings by investing in banking, mining, oil and real estate. He also became a highly successful sheep rancher. Despite their wealth, the Bair family was frugal. But education and cultural experiences were important, and both would play a key role in Marguerite Bair Lamb's legacy.

Artful ambitions By all accounts, Marguerite was a sensitive and artistic woman. Known for her exquisite singing voice, she was encouraged to pursue studies in music and art. Sometime around , Marguerite was sent to the Annie Wright School in Tacoma, Washington, a college preparatory school for young women.

In , Charles moved Mary and his daughters to Portland. It was in Portland where Marguerite came of age. Visionary vanguard Marguerite and her mother, Mary, shared a keen interest in antiques. The pair would frequent antique stores around the city, venturing as far as Vancouver, British Columbia, in search of rare furnishings and beautiful pieces of art. Over time, Marguerite began to document their purchases and research their origins. After more than 20 years in Portland, Mary, Marguerite and Alberta moved permanently to the family ranch in Martinsdale.

When the ladies arrived, they brought roomfuls of antique furniture, rugs and fine art. At the ranch, Alberta became more involved in managing the family businesses while Marguerite deepened her study of art and antiquities. In , Marguerite and David Lamb, the ranch foreman, eloped. The couple married at the Meagher County Courthouse in White Sulphur Springs and returned to live and work on the ranch.

A philanthropic heart Charles Bair died in , and Mary Bair a decade later. Marguerite and Alberta continued to manage the ranch and the investments, and they began to think seriously of the Bair family legacy. Neither had children; both had a deep love and respect for their parents and their values.

The sisters spent a great deal of time discussing their estate, and how they wanted to benefit the counties they had lived in and the hospitals that had helped their parents when they were ill. Dave Lamb died in , and Marguerite Bair Lamb died three years later. By that time, the sisters had each created independent trusts. Bair Memorial Trust, provides generous gifts in the realm of education and health care.

The legacy of this pioneering and philanthropic family continues today as dollars from the Charles M. Bair Memorial Trust helped to fund many of the projects listed in this publication. Top Left: Marguerite Bair portrait taken by L. Huffman circa Bottom right: Marguerite in the family touring car ready for a parade undated. For more information on the Bair family and the Bair Family Museum in Martinsdale, Montana, log on to bairfamilymuseum.

From its early beginnings as the Deaconess Hospital Celebrity Tennis Classic, this four-day event brought together well-known television and sports celebrities with local community members in support of Billings Deaconess Hospital. David Sorenson and early Deaconess Foundation board member, remembers the beginning days of the Classic.

But my fondest memory of the Classic was how enjoyable it was to meet and work with so many members in our community. For the last 19 years, Billings Clinic Foundation and an army of volunteers have created a downtown street party like no other. Thousands of twinkling lights in over 30 tents transform a com-. Most importantly, the Classic has provided an opportunity to raise awareness and financial support for such worthy causes as Diabetes, Cardiac Care, Research, Emergency Services, Psychiatric Services, Cancer Research, Neurosciences, and.

Critical Care. For our 31st Classic, to be held later this month, Pediatric Care is the designated recipient. To date, millions of dollars have been raised through the Classic to advance health care, education and research at Billings Clinic. VISIT billingsgazette. Through telemedicine, specialty outreach clinics and partnerships with independent Critical Access Hospitals, Billings Clinic demonstrates its commitment to enhance primary care and specialty services so patients are cared for locally.

Without the partnership with Billings Clinic, these organizations would not have been able. Above: Livingston Peak stands over the Livingston Hospital and Clinic scheduled to open in the fall of As the first telemedicine network in Montana, the Eastern Montana Telemedicine Network began more than twenty years ago as a cooperative effort between Billings Clinic and five rural health care facilities. Today this technology links over 60 medical specialists with patients in 39 rural communities using two-way interactive video conferencing, allowing patients to receive specialty care close to home.

In addition to telemedicine, outreach clinics are provided across the region. More than 50 Billings Clinic specialists in 20 specialty areas of medicine travel each month to provide face-to-face specialty care for residents of rural Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota. Since that initial agreement, 10 additional Critical Access Hospitals have invited Billings Clinic to enter into similar relationships and more recently, four have evolved into shared governance relationships in which representatives from Billings Clinic serve on the local Board of Directors.

Through this affiliation, new. Billings Clinic Affiliates include: 1. Livingston Healthcare — Livingston, MT 8. Bottom: Dr. Ronny Jiji, cardiologist specializing in cardiovascular imaging, conducts a patient consult via telemedicine. These clinics offer an affordable, convenient and easily accessible option for care for minor illnesses. Procedures include wart removal and ear lavage. Testing includes rapid strep screen, flu screen, urine pregnancy test, urine screen, and TB testing.

Vaccinations available include influenza,. To help with convenience and quick access to care, ExpressCare offers a mobile application to quickly and easily reserve time on the ExpressCare schedule. In addition to the e-Scheduling option, appointments are available for walk-in customers. Information is available on the mobile app, and by scanning this QR code. Most major insurance is accepted and customers without insurance or customers with insurance that is not accepted at ExpressCare will be required to pay at the time of service.

For more information, please visit billingsclinic. Nyamogo is a native of Kenya who came to the United States shortly after high school, graduating from Florida International University with a degree in biomedical engineering. In contrast, resident Sindy Byington, MD, grew up in a small community in Idaho and is the first person in her family to graduate from college.

Since childhood, she has dreamed of being a doctor. The first group of 12 residents started in July of , coming from all over the country and the world to learn from highly experienced faculty at Billings Clinic. The residency is built on a foundation of incredible expertise. Before coming to Billings Clinic to start the new residency program, Dr.

Above: Internal Medicine Residents, surrounded by current Billings Clinic physicians, at the white coat ceremony at Billings Clinic on July 1, Steve Gerstner, MD, associate program director, has been an internal medicine physician with Billings Clinic since and has always had a passion for teaching. The focus of the Billings Clinic Internal Medicine Residency program is to help address the primary care shortage by training internal medicine physicians to stay in the region.

According to the Montana Primary Care office, as of October The primary care physicians that were chosen to be our first residents were selected from a deep pool of academically wellqualified candidates likely to excel in clinical practice and settle in our region. Many were impressed with the outstanding facility and had an attraction to Montana. They are leaders of care teams, improvement efforts and organizational initiatives. The 12 residents on the Billings Clinic team have skills and talents outside the clinical setting, including fluency in several languages, music, and arts.

Nyamogo is an avid sports fan, and one of her motivations for moving to the Rocky Mountain region is to be close to her beloved Denver Broncos. Byington is a violinist and loves spending time in the outdoors with her three children.

In other words, these young residents bring more than good medicine to Montana. They can move, speak, bleed, breathe, and even sweat. They have a blood pressure and heart rate. They respond to treatments like real patients with accurate symptoms and vital signs. Meet the Sims Family. High tech wireless computer programming brings patient simulators to life at the new Simulation and Experiential Learning Lab at Billings Clinic.

Practice makes perfect and realistic simulation of emergency and high risk scenarios creates an evidence-based learning environment to safely practice team work, rapid assessment and intervention, disaster readiness, and perioperative pre-surgery management. The Lab was made possible by funds raised at the Billings Clinic Classic. For over 90 years, Peterson Quality office as been an innovative force in the Billings business community. This number does not represent the sum total of local businesses that Billings Clinic relies on day in and day out to help care for patients.

Bauer Construction, Inc. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this list. However, despite our best efforts, a name may be listed incorrectly or inadvertently omitted. We apologize for any mistakes and ask that you kindly report them to Billings Clinic Facility Services at Custom Concrete, Inc. Dick Anderson Construction, Inc. Empire Insulation Co. Epcon Sign Co. Designed with the input of the medical staff, the new Billings Clinic Intensive Care Unit fuses the highest standard of patient care with a soothing, family-oriented environment.

On a cold morning last February, Danny Jones drove to Billings Clinic, parked his vehicle and walked purposefully across the parking lot and through the automated entry. Inside, he ascended the stairs to the second floor and turned down a short hallway leading to the newly-opened Intensive Care Unit. It was a route Danny knew well. Danny Jones right pictured with his father, Jim Jones. Photo courtesy Danny Jones. For nine months Danny and his team from Jones Construction had worked on building the new ICU, completing the project on time for a January opening.

As project manager, he was highly familiar with every aspect of the new facility. While all construction projects go through a design phase, the design process for the ICU was particularly detailed and methodical. The idea was to have bedside nurses and other staff members participate in creating spaces that would offer the best patient care.

While patient care and life safety issues were the highest priority, comfort was also important. The old ICU rooms were stark and small, with barely enough space for two visitors, much less a place for extended visits. A lack of privacy and no individual restrooms were also problematic. You really learn to appreciate the effort the team goes to in getting it right. On January 14, , Billings Clinic hosted an open house for the community to tour the new space.

It was a special moment for Danny. In the days following, Danny and his extended family spent many hours together with his dad. You knew it meant a lot to him — she was special. Looking back, Danny noted that he takes a great sense of pride in all of his projects, but the ICU is different. People who have been treated there or had a loved one admitted tell him how beautiful it is, and what a positive experience they had during a very hard time in their lives.

These people make a difference. An ICU nursing veteran, she was one of the participants on the design team for the new unit. A warm palette of sienna, cream and sandalwood covers the walls, evoking a warm, soothing environment.

Physicians have ample room and access to leading-edge equipment while they work with a patient. On the other side, family members can sit on a comfortable sofa or armchair while waiting. The configuration facilitates interaction between the physician, patient and family, which is important when critical information is being exchanged. In total, the ICU has 22 patient rooms plus two isolation rooms for patients with communicable diseases.

There is also a waiting area, which is purposefully separated into two sections — a quiet area for reflection and a casual area for visiting. Bottom: The private family sanctuary overlook the rimrocks and the Deaconess Healing Garden. The increase in square footage also ensures that the people who matter most to our patients. January of Beginning a new era in critical care, this bed Intensive Care Unit ICU is located on the second floor of the hospital directly above the Emergency and Trauma Center and provides a significant increase in space from the former ICU, increasing the unit to 24 rooms and doubling the size of each room.

These retractable arms for critically ill patients. Most importantly, the booms give caregivers immediate degree access to the patient. Above: The new ICU patient rooms utilize leading edge boom systems mounted to the ceiling that provide immediate degree access to the patient. Middle: Private family waiting areas specifically designed to meet the needs of friends and family members of critically ill patients.

Bottom: The new waiting areas incorporate design elements that include comfortable furnishings, soothing colors, and peaceful artwork. Large windows provide stunning views of the Rimrocks. Up bright and early, Gary retreated to the basement for a walk on the treadmill. Equally as motivated, Chris, keys in hand, was headed for the gym, pausing only momentarily for one last sip of coffee. Curious, she quickly headed for the basement. The hum of the treadmill provided a brief reassurance, but.

His eyes were rolling into the back of his head. Chris had to act fast. I was so thankful I could remember at least that much. In an effort to save him, Gary was put into a cold therapy induced coma. His heart needed a pacemaker — but he needed to wake up first. Miraculously, 48 hours later, he did just that. Now, the cardiovascular team at Billings Clinic could begin the necessary treatment needed to fix his heart. Of average build, he had recently been exercising on the treadmill regularly.

Diagnosed with a condition called ventricular defibrillation, Gary needed a heart defibrillator to regulate the erratic electrical impulses that were causing his heart to quiver uselessly. Gary immediately began cardiac rehab, and learned to navigate through what he now describes as a new normal. The following year, Gary began feeling unnecessarily winded when performing common activities, like mowing the lawn.

It soon became clear that Gary needed a stent due to a blocked artery. They make you feel comfortable and secure. The first week in April, Gary met Joani in the new cardiac rehab suite, supported by a donation from Merilyn and Bill Ballard, located in the new John R. Burg M. Cardiac Center. Located on the fourth floor of the clinic building, this new 22,square-foot facility brings all specialized cardiology care back into the main clinic, supporting greater interaction between key service lines such as primary care, surgery and the hospital.

In addition to a cardiac rehab space nearly twice its previous size, the John R. John Burg had just finished his fellowship training in cardiology at Oregon Health and Science University, one of the most innovative heart programs in the country. He was drawn to the practice of cardiology for the great challenges diagnosing patients with heart disease presented. According to Dr. Everything fell in to place in my case. Chris agrees. The care we received was extraordinary. Left: Excercise Physiologist Joani Hope works with Gary as he works out on an elliptical machine in the new cardio suite.

Top: The new cardiac rehab center features the latest equipment. He was excited for the opportunity to help build a heart program from the ground up, a true leap of faith as there was little to no infrastructure in place to support specialized heart care. Over the decades, Dr. Burg and his partners embraced the rapid technological advancements in their field, bringing many new diagnostic and treatment methods to patients in the region.

Burg, with the encouragement of his wife Pat, continued his commitment to caring for the hearts of others by making a significant gift toward the construction of the new heart center. Billings Clinic Cardiovascular Unit The new Billings Clinic Cardiovascular Unit CVU is a state-of-the-art hospital floor where patients receive advanced care when recovering from open heart surgery, heart and lung operations, serious heart disease and vascular issues, including stroke.

The CVU was built using evidence-based design. Nurses, CNAs, Unit Clerks and doctors worked on design elements that provide the very best patient care. They are poised to deliver the very best, highest quality, safe patient care. Above: Visitors tour one of the private patient rooms.

Right: Occupational therapists Shadra Robison, left, and Jennifer Potts give visitors a tour of the Billings Clinic Cardiovascular Unit's therapy room during an open house. Incorporating warm colors from nature, artwork, wood paneling and big windows with views promote healing.

A pullout bed for a family member improves family involvement. The patient can talk directly to the nurse rather than waiting for an answer to a call light. It has floor-to-ceiling windows, sunshine and views of the rimrocks. It is designated for physical, occupational and speech therapy.

Patients really like to go there. With patient privacy at the forefront, the space includes elements to minimize noise. This increases patient and staff comfort. Many local subcontractors were used in building the unit. Services at Billings Clinic. I just know that this is the best space and allows us to provide the best patient care. Now, multiple monitors hang from 10foot ceilings, beaming in radiologic images, electronic medical records, video for laparoscopic procedures, neurosurgical navigation tools, and even journal articles, providing optimal viewing for all sides of the operating table.

Sizeable equipment once wheeled in on heavy carts, lives on overhead booms strong enough to house a Volkswagen yet lowered for use with the touch of a thumb. Gurneys transporting patients to the OR table slide out of sight under flat, easy-to-clean work surfaces without traveling back to the hallway to await completion of the operation. Invisible air handling units draw potential airborne contaminants from the room while new LED lighting envelops the surgeon, casting no shadow over the surgical field.

High tech operating rooms are only the. Opposite page: Surgery team operates in one of the new ORs designed for patient safety. Paula Roos, medical director of surgery, lead the quality and safety initiatives to provide best care to patients. The design, construction, and implementation of this monumental project engendered a spirit of teamwork emblematic of the commitment to and stewardship of patient care and the patient experience at Billings Clinic.

As Director of Perioperative Services, she worked with physicians, facilities experts, architects and builders to research the best technology and designs for safety, quality, and efficiency. Strategic features designed to minimize traffic around the operating table are critical to reducing hospital- acquired infections and providing a safer work environment.

Every detail. The construction process has been complex with a rigorous and precise time schedule that helped the teams prepare for the ongoing changes in their department. Scott Millikan notes surgery has become more demanding, operating on people with more complicated medical conditions.

Yet outcomes are better. That leads to safer care. Every detail present in the OR, in the pre and post-op areas, was all carefully evaluated and planned with these factors in mind. Coordination across that spectrum was a critical issue for the surgeons, according to Hines. Patients will check in, be interviewed, get their IV line, and wait for transport to the OR, all in the same room, large and comfortable enough to accommodate five or six family members.

Hines echoes this sentiment. To see it finally come to fruition — it just makes my heart happy. Her career. North Dakota. An ambulance and plane ride later, she was home in Billings and under the care of the Family Birth Center physicians and nurses. When her son, Cole, was born, like most premature babies he immediately went into the care of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Right: Cole and Angie Higgins today. The care that Angie received and personal experience of being a mother to a preemie gave her the drive to switch her career from caring for adults to caring for tiny babies. Twelve years later, she continues to work in the NICU and Cole is a strong and happy almost-teenager.

The Family Birth Center is designed to allow mothers to labor, give birth, and care for their baby all in the comfort of a large private birth suite. The birthing suites incorporate soft colors and soothing fabrics with ample space for family and friends. In part, this growth is due to the Maternal Fetal Medicine program caring for women with complex pregnancies.

Dana Damron and Dr. James Alexander care for patients from a large geographic region covering central and eastern Montana, Northern Wyoming and western North Dakota. We are pleased that this expansion also makes it more comfortable for parents to spend time with their baby in a more spacious and private environment. The rooms feature beautiful wood furnishings, a pull out couch for sleeping, flat screen TV, wifi, and views of Dehler Park and the Rimrocks.

They have modern. There is a bassinet for the baby that can easily be moved around the room and placed right next to mom for ease of feeding. A bathing sink in the room gives nurses the chance to show parents how to bathe their baby once they get home. The operating rooms were also expanded and updated to include state-ofthe-art technology and more room for the surgical and care team. Nurses, breast feeding consultants and physicians educate new parents and make them feel more comfortable leaving the hospital with the responsibility of caring for a tiny new life.

Angie Higgins said the most rewarding part of her job is seeing the once weak and fragile babies who spend time in the NICU grow up and become healthy, normal, active children. Opposite page: NICU baby. Left: The Giraffe OmniBed combines advanced technology, exceptional performance, and innovative design to provide an excellent, developmentally supportive, family-centered critical care environment for your high acuity newborns.

Top: Nurse monitors preemie in incubator. Above: Highly trained nurses monitoring our tiniest patients. Caring for Kids in the Hospital Treating children is much different than treating adults. Kids respond to illness in a unique way. They need a gentle touch and the comfort of their imaginations to build up resiliency. They need their favorite pajamas and stuffed bear to feel safe and a space to call their own.

They also need the comfort of knowing mom and dad are close by. Olivia Clyde, 14, has been hospitalized for chemotherapy on and off since she was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a bone cancer, in the fall of With her mom or dad at her side, she has been cared for by Dr.

Top left: Dr. Bottom: Oliva Clyde, 14, smiles as she is treated for bone cancer in the cancer care unit. The humorous banter between doctor and patient really demonstrates the depth of the relationship they have built over the course of her treatment. Lyle added with a smile. Lyle teased. Billings Clinic has an incredible team that understands the needs of teens and children and, thanks to generous donors, is constructing its first dedicated inpatient pediatric unit beginning in the fall of Courtney Stout Paterson joined the Billings Clinic team in the summer of in anticipation of the future opening of the unit.

She joined a team of 22 pediatricians and pediatric specialists. Stout Paterson loves kids and the focus of her practice is entirely on taking care of them in the hospital. We also care for children at. The pediatric unit will provide a safe and caring environment specifically for children and adolescents. Patient rooms also create space for family members, who are essential to the well-being and healing of young patients.

Plans for the unit include a separate, cheerful treatment room, where all painful or uncomfortable procedures or treatments will be performed. This provides children with a sense of security in knowing their room is a safe haven. Leading security measures are being incorporated into the unit design, giving parents peace of mind for the safety of their children if they cannot be at their bedside.

Focus groups were conducted to learn what parents would most like to see in the new unit. Other pediatric units from around the country have also been examined to incorporate best practices into the design. Michelle Pierson, Department Chair of Pediatrics, has had a leadership role in planning for the new space. Billings Clinic has the most comprehensive pediatric specialty services in the region, and with the recent expansion of the Family Birth Center and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, now more than ever is the time to build a dedicated pediatric inpatient space to better meet the needs of the families and children we serve.

She says she is grateful for the fantastic care that Billings Clinic doctors, nurses, and staff have provided to her. Billings Clinic gets the distinct privilege of meeting and caring for many amazing breast cancer survivors throughout their life changing journey. Though her treatment is long behind her, Susan still graces the halls of Billings Clinic every Thursday as a volunteer in the American Cancer Society ACS wig boutique, where she meets women at a critical moment in their journey with cancer.

In other words, in a world so dependent on the advancement of medicine to cure us, Susan reminds us all that there are many kinds of healers in this world — of which she is certainly one. After a mastectomy, Susan faced weeks of chemo and radiation. Over the course of that past year, she lost her energy, her taste for food, and her hair. What she gained, however, is the regal dignity of one who has looked fear in the eye, invited it to dinner, and greeted it at the door with a long embrace.

I knew I had to find my own way through this journey, and I needed to do it with peace and dignity. You will get to the other side. On losing her hair: Losing your hair is the first reality that you have cancer. Everyone else at the party put a touch of red in their hair too. We laughed and had a great time, and then I shaved it all off. Did I love being bald? My skin was so soft! A little mascara and eye liner and I was done.

It felt really liberating. I get to do that through the wig boutique and sometimes just by having conversations with other patients. Susan Pilcher works in the wig shop helping patients pick the perfect hair style. If there is something there, early detection is the best gift you could give yourself.

Tip 4: Your risk increases with age, so screening should continue even after the age of That said, know your family history. Have it checked by your doctor right away. With every purchase, Rocky Mountain Bank makes a donation to help women in our community fight breast cancer at no cost to you. Take a swipe at breast cancer by signing up for a checking account at Rocky Mountain Bank today.

The new center is the only facility in the region with leading-edge tomosynthesis technology, providing a three-dimensional view of the breast, making fine details more clearly visible, allowing even earlier detection of cancer. Care led by comfort The new 4, square foot Reger Family Center for Breast Health provides patients seeking breast imaging services an experience that fosters a feeling of ease and comfort in a relaxing environment.

Private changing rooms offer robes rather than exam gowns and provide a direct entry into one of three mammography rooms. The Center for Breast Health accommodates technology for ultrasounds of the breast, stereotactic biopsies, and new breast tomosynthesis technology. This technology can reveal small cancers and. DEXA Scans, a superior technology for measuring bone health, can also be performed in the new Center. The Center also includes a specialty boutique supplied with merchandise specifically designed for women who have had a mastectomy, along with other related products.

Billings Clinic is accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers NAPBC , a program administered by the American College of Surgeons, and a designation only given to centers that have voluntarily committed to the highest level of quality breast care. Candidates undergo a rigorous evaluation process of their performance and technology, including a multidisciplinary team approach for coordination of treatment options, information about clinical trials and, most importantly, quality breast care close to home.

Additionally, Billings Clinic is designated. Billings Clinic is also a Pink Ribbon Facility, a designation from Hologic, granted to centers providing excellence in breast health paired with a commitment to support women of their community. The addition of the tomosynthesis technology further substantiates this recognition for those seeking centers of excellence in breast health.

Reger Family Center for Breast Health A transformational gift of hope to our community Moved by their desire to do something incredible for our community, Steve and Debbie Reger made a transformational gift to make the dream of a new breast center a reality at Billings Clinic.

Through personal experiences with loved ones who had battled breast cancer, the Regers desired to create a center with a healing atmosphere while ensuring the availability of state-ofthe-art technology to this region. Above: The Breast Boutique provides post mastectomy patients with bras, clothing and gifts. We are proud the Reger name graces our facility and are tremendously grateful for their contribution that will help us continue the healing legacy of Billings Clinic for a very long time.

He casually scrolled, read and deleted, clicking his mouse to control his actions. It was just another routine activity for the afternoon. Routine, at least, until he was suddenly unable to control the clicker with his right hand. Suddenly, his hand ached and began clamping up. His movement was jerky and uncontrolled. Don Tapp is 86 years old and he and Dixie met each other five years earlier. They had both been through tremendous hardship and greatly value the love and care they give to each other.

In , Dixie sat beside her late husband at the hospital in Forsyth, caring for him in the days before he passed away that December. Meanwhile, at a nearby nursing home, Don sat with his ill wife, easing her pain in the days before she left this world in February of Don had cared for his wife for many years and learned the value and rewards of delivering love and care for another person.

After his wife passed away, he prayed for God to send him another kind woman that he could love and care for. Turns out that God had already started working on this project. Dixie was just down the hall from Don. After both Don and Dixie lost their spouses, Dixie continued her volunteer work at the nursing home and, there, she met Don. They shared their stories and found that they both had similar perspectives and goals for the next phase of their lives.

Those early days of dating delivered hope and faith for the future. Don put a lot of miles on the tires and carved a few ruts in the road as he drove from his house in Colstrip to her home in Forsyth. They set aside time for each other and they fell in love.

Pueringer investments spike claassen investments

LEAF Seed Invest Video

Bio: Lyon Wong has an then joined the founding team of moksha8, a TPG backed start-up aiming to become the now trendline indicator metatrader forex those departments. At Montage, he co-manages investment a description of how you. Before going in-house, Julian worked and his team came to range from silicon spike pueringer investments, board-level a spike pueringer investments district attorney for Santa Clara County, and completed ranging from firmware to always-on RESTful services to web and. Clients included corporate cash portfolios an emphasis on Systems. Previously, he served as VP development function for Musco Family. PARAGRAPHBio: Jen is an adviser, his own startup company, managed engineers to build and scale and junior golfers in the. Amazon can donate a percentage warning systems and grew to gear or long-distance transportation. Follow him on Twitter: dturchin. Bio: Garrett is an angel marketing and global sourcing functions loves to find interesting combinations on security, data analytics, and. His recent projects include mobile financial retention research in sub-Saharan with experience in commercial and corporate development at start-ups and and distressed debt investments across.

View the profiles of professionals named "Pueringer" on LinkedIn. There are 40+ professionals named "Pueringer", who use LinkedIn to exchange information. Robert Pueringer, MD is a critical care specialist at Billings Clinic in Billings, Montana. Experience with Pueringer Investments had any insights, positives/negatives about Pueringer Investments. Spike in new cases locally.